Abstracts


Learning in Context: Student Success in the Real World

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM
Venue: 222

Presentation Content:

While initiatives on Project-Based Learning (PBL) are not new, Brookdale Community College has implemented PBL undertakings beyond the individual classroom by working in inter-disciplinary teams. The presenters will share techniques and tools whereby faculty can challenge students to investigate subject matter, issues, or problems of interest to them by solving global problems modeled by local projects. Highlighting our successful projects The Greening of Brookdale, Habitat for Humanity, and Helping Hands, with the use of a faculty framework, student-selected technology, and assessment tools, participants will come away with ideas and techniques for implementation at their own institution.

Presenter(s):

Katherine Edward
Director of Educational Services Outcome Assessment
Brookdale Community College

Tom Berke
Professor of Chemistry
Brookdale Community College


Open and Affordable Textbook (OAT) Grant Program at Rutgers University

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM
Venue: 205

Presentation Content:

The high cost of textbooks can impede academic success and contribute to already soaring student debt. Many students at Rutgers and elsewhere in the country choose to delay buying their textbooks or do not buy them at all. Data from the College Board suggests that students at Rutgers are estimated to pay over $1300 for course materials annually, an amount higher than the national average. In 2016, the President of Rutgers University approved the creation of an open and affordable textbook grant program as a one-year pilot. Rutgers University Libraries was asked to administer the grant program on all Rutgers campuses. The program was intended to encourage faculty to replace traditional course materials with open or affordable options, increase awareness of textbook affordability, generate “success stories” that can be used in future textbook affordability and OER initiatives, and develop recommendations and build support for extending the project beyond the one-year pilot. This break out session will describe the creation of the Open and Affordable Textbook Grants at Rutgers University, present preliminary results of the program, and offer tips for other institutions who are interested in creating an affordable textbook initiative. As of early 2017, thirty-two grants have been awarded to faculty across Rutgers, and the courses that will be redesigned as a result of these grants will generate an estimated $1.5 million in student savings over four semesters.

Presenter(s):

Lily Todorinova

Game Design and Student Retention: An Opportunity for NJEdge

Track 3: Gamification/Emerging Technologies
Time: 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM
Venue: 225

Presentation Content:

Good design produces ancillary benefits. Engagement science applies the principles of gameful design to non-game situations - in this case to the problem of low rates of student retention and completion. We summarize how and why (a) 50 years of student retention research has not improved completion rates, (b) higher education is already a poorly designed game, (c) game design principles can liberate the creativity of administrators, (d) early empirical tests generally support a gameful approach, and (e) a cooperative NJEdge can choose to become the innovation leader for student retention

Presenter(s):

Thomas Heinzen
William Paterson University

Thomas Heinzen is a professor of psychology at William Paterson University and director of the Game-Based Experience Lab (GBEL). He is the author of several books and journal articles and also textbooks about Statistics (Worth Publishers) and Social Psychology (Sage Publishers). He has mentored more than 60 student presentations and received a variety of student recognitions for mentoring young researchers.


Mass Murder in the Classroom: The John List Case Study Open Educational Resource Project

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 10:50 AM - 11:20 AM
Venue: 228

Presentation Content:

In 1971, John List murdered his wife, mother, and three teenage children in his dilapidated Westfield Mansion. He remained a fugitive for nearly 18 years before technology and tenacity caught up to him. He died in prison while serving 5 life sentences for the murders. Now, in partnership with Union County, the College has launched an Open Educational Resource module showcasing case materials. These materials are available for free via Canvas and include lesson plans, simulations, and other content for use in English, History, Psychology, Legal Studies, and Criminal Justice.

Presenter(s):

Beth Ritter Guth
Union County College

Beth Ritter-Guth is the Director of Instructional Design and Director of American Honors at Union County College. Her use of innovative technology and virtual worlds in the teaching of literature has been recognized by the Chronicle of Higher Education, USA Today, America Online, and Wired Magazine. She was the 2016 recipient of the NJEdge Charles McMickle Award for Innovation and Leadership. She received the Nobel Educator of Distinction Award in 2012 and The Faculty of the Future Award from the National Association of Independent Schools in 2010. Beth's most distinctive work was in using Second Life to create 64 literary sims including Dante's Inferno, Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Rime of the Ancient Mariner, and Gloria Naylor's Mama Day. Beth holds a BA in English, a BA in Communication, and a MA in English.

Chris Eline
Union County College

Chris is a professional firefighter in Bethlehem, PA. His denial to access the John List case files inspired him to reach out to Beth Ritter-Guth. Their initial visit to see the materials launched the John List Case Study OER project.


Gaming STEM in Humanities Courses

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 11:25 AM - 11:50 AM
Venue: 223

Presentation Content:

Using game design elements in non-game settings to engage participants and encourage desired behaviors is gamification. This technique was used in a project of Web Adventures using crime scene investigation (CSI) developed by Rice University. The goals were to increase students' science knowledge through free, online serious games, and to inspire science-related careers. I became involved as a reviewer and tester in the development phase, and have since used the programs in teaching humanities courses that are not typically considered STEM subjects. These experiments are based on studies of student success that show that increased student engagement in learning activities produces greater improvement in learning outcomes.

Presenter(s):

Kenneth Ronkowitz
NJIT

Ken Ronkowitz started in education teaching English at the middle and high school level. He was the Manager of Instructional Technology at NJIT and has worked in higher education since 2000. Ken taught in the humanities at Passaic County College, Montclair State University and continues to teach part-time at NJIT.


Assessment opens a gateway to learning

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 11:25 AM - 11:50 AM
Venue: 206

Presentation Content:

Large introductory courses act as gateways, as passage is required to proceed through the curriculum. They also act as gateways as passage opens up the future. Assessment can help open up the door by linking labs, lectures and homework. The careful control of assessment complexity can also open the door by raising standards for high grades and by controlling the failure rate. Data indicate that learning can improve.

Presenter(s):

Gordon Thomas

Professor of Physics at NJIT. Worked previously at Bell Labs, Univ of Tokyo, Harvard, MIT. Fellow of the Am Phys Soc and Nat Acad of Inventors. Presented papers at the Nat Conf on Excellence in Teaching in '16 and '17. Received NJIT Award for Teaching Excellence in '15. Course Super for 500-student intro course in '16/'17


Step Your Gaming Up: Engage Students with Gamification

Track 3: Gamification/Emerging Technologies
Time: 11:25 AM - 11:50 AM
Venue: 227

Presentation Content:

Gamification is a sizzlin’ topic since research has shown how gaming elements can mesh with academia and increase student learning. Your imagination, creativity, and some tools in your LMS can transform your course into a game-like, academic experience.

Presenter(s):

Jenna Corraro
NJIT

Jenna Corraro is an Instructional Designer and an adjunct in the Humanities Department at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. She graduated from Rutgers with a B.A. in English Literature with a certification to teach secondary schools with specialization in urban areas. She then went to NJIT to pursue a Master’s in Professional and Technical Communication. Her experience as an Instructional Designer and Moodle administrator cultivated a deep interest in “gamification” and the effect it has on engagement in academia.

Amanda Molina
NJIT

Amanda Molina is an Instructional Designer at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. She graduated from the University of Central Florida with a B.A. in English: Technical Communication and is pursuing a Master’s of Education in Curriculum and Instruction. As a former high school teacher in Orlando, Florida, Amanda brings many of her pedagogical and technological expertise to NJIT. She assists faculty with implementing educational technology best suited for their pedagogy.


Analogies to Art and Music: Clarifying Content in Non-Major Science Courses

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 11:25 AM - 11:50 AM
Venue: 229

Presentation Content:

Recently programs designed to encourage science, technology, engineering, and math [STEM] careers have advocated use of art in the teaching of scientific disciplines [i.e. from STEM to STEAM]. This inclusion of art in science courses is observed to enhance the accessibility of the course particularly to those with different learning styles. This presentation describes the use of abstract art and music analogies to help non-science majors learn basic concepts in the scientific disciplines of toxicology and ecology. Course activities involving use of art and music analogies will be discussed; examples of analogies developed by students will be included.


Presenter(s):

Dona Huggins
Stockton University

Dr. Huggins. has been teaching science to undergraduate, graduate, and non-traditional students at multiple institutions of higher education in New Jersey for fifteen [15] years. She has been teaching science to non-science majors at Stockton University since 2010. She uses the Blackboard learning management system extensively to teach in online and hybrid formats. She incorporates abstract visual art and music analogies in her science courses as a means of helping students develop a deeper understanding of basic concepts.


STEM Concepts and Lessons in Life Made Meaningful through the Game of Chess

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 11:55 AM - 12:20 PM
Venue: 222

Presentation Content:

This presentation describes the design of a novel teaching chess set specially developed to pique girls’ interest in chess and STEM in order to empower their self-efficacy for success in science. Its creation relied on CAD, 3D printing, imagination, and learning strategy theory. For K - 12 educators, chess offers an innovative, gamified method for teaching critical thinking, higher-level analytical skills. Furthermore, this chess project includes a literary work, providing teaching moments in good civic-minded behavior which can be learned through playing chess for both boys and girls equally. This chess education project is a work-in-progress, and collaboration from researchers, educators, writers, chess enthusiasts, curriculum professionals, etc. is welcome.

Presenter(s):

Jill Findley
Monmouth University

Jill Lucas Findley, Ph.D., M.S., received her doctorate in Educational Psychology-Quantitative Methods and Research Design from the City University of New York and a Master’s degree from Columbia University. She is an adjunct professor in the Physician Assistant Program at Monmouth University. Her research interests include: promoting opportunities for young girls to develop an interest in STEM and chess through gamification, statistical meta-analysis techniques and research methods, and health care/physical medicine and rehabilitation research.


Real-time Assessment of Student Learning using Tech Tools in Teaching

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 11:55 AM - 12:20 PM
Venue: 205

Presentation Content:

In this presentation, we will discuss how we take advantage of free technology tools to enhance the learning environment in their classrooms and increase student engagement. These tools enable the instructor to gauge students' understanding in real time and adjust their teaching accordingly.

Presenter(s):

Padma Natarajan
Bruce Bukiet

Padma Natarajan is a University Lecturer and Bruce Bukiet is an Associate Professor in the Department of Mathematical Sciences. Between them, they have won a number of teaching awards and are pioneers in incorporating technology to advance student engagement and understanding in their courses at NJIT.

Makerspaces in Higher Education: Supporting Innovation, Creativity, and Communities of Practice

Track 3: Gamification/Emerging Technologies
Time: 11:55 AM - 12:20 PM
Venue: 225

Presentation Content:

Recent shifts in education from a teacher-centered to a learner-centered paradigm are creating opportunities to design new learning spaces to support innovation, creativity, and build communities. Makerspaces, in particular, have become prominent in large Engineering or science programs as way to foster student making/tinkering within the major. However, the realities of a liberal arts university require a campus makerspace that works across disciplines. This presentation will demonstrate how a liberal arts university makerspace reveals an overlap in the common technology needs of individuals, groups, and disciplines to build an interconnected learning community on campus.

Presenter(s):

Veronica Armour
Seton Hall University

Veronica Armour is an Instructional Designer that develops educational experiences that integrate technology. She has experience with developing online courses and exploring developing technologies. Her primary areas of focus are online course development, maker spaces/flexible learning spaces, and the Digital Humanities. Veronica is interested in cracking open the black box of technology to explore how things work then sharing that knowledge with others. Veronica’s career path from Social Studies teacher to Associate Editor of Geography and Chemistry Digital Educational materials to Instructional Designer has led her down the rabbit hole of technology. She comes to technology with an “outsider’s” perspective and whether she is leading a design thinking workshop or developing an online course or training someone on how to create a website she works to bring “insider” knowledge to students and faculty as they build their digital presence.


Create and Accelerate Learning with Adobe Presenter Add-on

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 11:55 AM - 12:20 PM
Venue: 229

Presentation Content:

There has been a call to action to focus on making learning more flexible and accessible. In order to accomplish these tasks, courses/programs must support on-demand learning with immediate accessibility. Additionally, curriculum design must adopt competency based models that can more easily be measured and accordingly, the learner can accelerate their learning. To support these endeavors, the software add-on, Adobe Presenter, is being utilized to redesign course content and integrate competency based learning assessment into course modules. This session will review the software and its application as well as demonstrate how to set up skills measurement strategy.


Presenter(s):

Noel Criscione-Naylor
Stockton University

Dr. Noel Criscione-Naylor is a high-performing, multi-certified educational leader with a record of delivering best-in-class learning programming that has consistently delivered improved engagement and performance levels across the casino, hospitality, food and beverage, and most recently in the higher education space. Dr. Criscione-Naylor has proven leadership in improving employee development and performance delivery solutions through the design, innovation and delivery of relevant and progressive blended-learning solutions. Additionally, she has exceled in developing learning solutions for businesses with complex needs and diverse stakeholders.


Illumira & CSI – The End User Experience

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 1:50 PM - 2:15 PM
Venue: 223

Presentation Content:

The College of Staten Island needed a video repository and streaming solution to meet the needs of faculty, students and staff. After evaluating several, we decided to acquire Illumira (formerly known as NJVID.) Our presentation will focus on the uses of Illumira by the campus community including its integration with our LMS, Blackboard.


Presenter(s):

Linda John
College of Staten Island

Linda John is the Director of Academic Computing for the Office of Information Technology Services at the College of Staten Island. Linda began her career at CSI over 15 years ago, and is responsible for hardware and software for student computers, public access stations, and multimedia classrooms on campus. Linda has led various technology initiatives at CSI including Virtual Desktop Initiatives (VDI), classroom redesign, and video repository solutions. She is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Mathematics. Linda received her BS from St. John’s University and her MS from the College of Staten Island, both in Computer Science.

Michael Castelli
College of Staten Island

Michael Castelli is an Academic Technology Specialist and the Senior Blackboard Administrator at the College of Staten Island. Before joining the college in 2015, Michael worked for over 15 years in Systems Development, Systems Administration, and Project Management in the private sector. He has managed the full systems development life cycle (SDLC) for large-scale applications development projects, in addition to supporting international users and managing offshore development teams. He is currently a member of the CUNY Blackboard Management Council, as well as several other CUNY-Wide Blackboard committees. In addition to a BS degree from Empire State College, he holds several current IT certifications from Microsoft, CompTIA, and Blackboard.

Mark Lewental
College of Staten Island

Mark Lewental is currently the Director of Library and Media Technologies at the College of Staten Island (CSI). He has held that position since 1998. Mr. Lewental has been with the College since 1987 and with City University of New York (CUNY) since 1981. He holds a BS degree in Communications and a MS in Liberal Studies from CSI. His interests are in technology, copyright and their intersection.


It’s All About Performance…Implementing Learning Outcomes Across the Gen Ed Curriculum

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 1:50 PM - 2:15 PM
Venue: 206

Presentation Content:

At Montclair State University, the Instructional Design team is collaborating with the General Education Committee, headed by Dr. Kirk McDermid, to pilot the implementation assessment of Learning Outcomes across a diverse general education curriculum. Universities and departments must collect and report their assessment and Learning Outcomes data to an assortment of accreditation agencies (Middle States, discipline specific, etc.). At this session we will present the collaborative process that led to the implementation and testing plan, from both a technical and an assessment point of view, and discuss how this can be replicated at the department, program and university level.

Presenter(s):

Keith Adams

Keith Adams is an Instructional Designer with Montclair State University. Coming to MSU with an extensive background in teaching and instructional design, Keith has been an Associate Professor at Rowan University and an Instructional Designer at both Seton Hall and New York Universities. The integration of new technologies into existing and evolving curricula continues to be one of the fastest growing areas of education and Keith's work reflects a commitment to the advancement of teaching, learning and creativity through these efforts. He has an MFA in Digital Media and Photography from Rutgers University, and an MA in Arts and Humanities Education from New York University.

Kirk McDermid

Trained as an epistemologist and philosopher of science after a bachelor's degree in physics, Kirk has interests in general philosophy of science and epistemology, as well as miracles, philosophy of quantum theory, and plagiarism. He teaches courses in epistemology, logic & critical thinking, and philosophy of science, and his teaching focuses on incorporating game design elements to facilitate differentiated learning, intrinsic motivation, and student autonomy. He has been involved in Montclair State's General Education program since 2012, leading faculty to reform and renew the curriculum to increase its internal coherence and its connections with disciplinary programs.


Using Synchronous Technology to Increase Student Engagement, Collaboration, and Discussion

Track 3: Game, Robotics, EmTech, Science
Time: 1:50 PM - 2:15 PM
Venue: 227

Presentation Content:

Nikki Bosca and Michael Koskinen will share their experience using Twitter and Google Classroom as tools to engage in live discussion with students, both in and out of the classroom. Using these tools has allowed the instructors to reach students who may otherwise remain silent and passive during class time, record discussions for later review by both students and teachers, and create a traceable history of student interactions.


Presenter(s):

Nikki Bosca
NJIT

Nikki Bosca is currently working as an Instructional Designer at the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a writing consultant at the Center for Writing Excellence at Montclair State University. Her previous experiences include teaching as an adjunct instructor in the First-Year Writing programs at both Montclair State University and Pace University. Nikki combines her experiences teaching in the classroom and working one-on-one with writers to promote student learning as she works with NJIT faculty to develop their courses to best meet learning objectives.

Michael Koskinen
NJIT

Michael Koskinen works at NJIT as the Assistant Director for Digital Learning. Mike likes to help faculty better use technology in the classroom, developing online learning, and his research interests are on the use of improving the college experience for students using technology. He is the administrator for NJIT learning systems, works as an adjunct professor of Education and Computer Science at Caldwell University, and is a doctoral student in education at Northeastern University.


"What is "You Tube" and how it benefits Learning in Higher Education"

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 1:50 PM - 2:15 PM
Venue: 229

Presentation Content:

Stevens Institute of Technology Castle Point on Hudson Hoboken, New Jersey Since 2011, I have been teaching at Stevens Institute of Technology English Language Communication. This University course and its description incorporate a long list of communication practices taught to reinforce and strengthen language learning and acquisitor. ELC 81 is a communication course that focuses on the improvement of the essential tasks and skills necessary for success in academic writing at the graduate university level. This course also has emphasis on developing oral strategies for academic, social, and professional interaction. There are a variety of materials and task based activities used in this class that help students gain competence and confidence in writing and speaking both formally and informally. The most important goals this class is expected to accomplish are to become critical readers, better writers, to develop discussion, teamwork skills, intonation, summary/ paraphrasing skills, improve pronunciation, effective presenters and to gain knowledge of the American culture. What better than YouTube to do all of this!

Presenter(s):

Anna Liberatore
Stevens Institute of Technology

Traveling to the Peak... A Ticket to Student Success Instructor's Guidebook included...

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 2:20 PM - 2:45 PM
Venue: 222

Presentation Content:

This interactive presentation will highlight a new paradigm that encourages high student achievement, as researched and formulated by experts, Anders Ericsson and Roger Pool in their booK: PEAK: Secrets from the New Science of Expertise. Come share your best teaching practices and explore ways that students can reach their optimum best, by incorporating motivational techniques that build on their potential, focus their full attention, and acclimate them to new ways to excel. We will look at new pathways to help students achieve academic success... a step beyond GRIT. These scientists debunk the myth that only the innately gifted can become experts. They say experts can be made. It just takes lots of exposure, focused practice, and active monitoring. Let's be those expert monitors, who nurture our students on their exciting road to the Peak! And yes, you will receive practical hands on rubrics and motivational material. Guidebook included!


Presenter(s):

Barbara Burke
Brookdale Community College

Barbara Burke currently teaches Research Writing and Speech at Brookdale Community College. Professor Burke is a 25 year veteran of college teaching at DeVry University, where she had taught Writing, Tech. Communication, and Critical Thinking. She especially likes to learn and practice new instructing ideas that motivate students, without taking the fun out of learning!


Familiarity, Flexibility, Funding, and Faculty Buy-In: The indispensable roles of the four “Fs” in the evolution of an implementation team in OER course design

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 2:20 PM - 2:45 PM
Venue: 205

Presentation Content:

The presenters will explain how each of the aforementioned factors were essential during the implementation of a nascent OER project at Passaic County Community College, demonstrating how the process behind the product is critical to student success. The various shareholders will go into detail about the infrastructure that facilitated the formation of a successful team, the characteristics of effective team members, and the factors that assisted in the recruitment of faculty champions. The OER team at PCCC anticipates that their efforts will not only save students money, but will also energize instruction and eventually contribute to student success.


Presenter(s):

Greg Fallon
Ken Karol
Martha Brozyna

Greg Fallon is Associate Dean of Learning Resources at Passaic County Community College, where he has provided leadership in the library, in distance education, and in the writing center, as well as served as project manager for two major federal grant-funded initiatives in writing and course redesign.

Ken Karol is a Technology Resource Specialist at Passaic County Community College, where he also teaches Comparative Religion as an adjunct instructor. His past roles at PCCC include Librarian and Instructional Designer. He has a B.A. in Religion and an M.L.S. from Rutgers University.

Martha Brozyna is a History Instructor at Passaic County Community College where she teaches courses in Western Civilization, US and Latin American History. She holds a B.A. in History and Political Science from Rutgers University and a Ph.D. in medieval history from the University of Southern California.


Video Projects in the Classroom: Teaching and Learning Sustainabiity Marketing

Track 3: Game, Robotics, EmTech, Science
Time: 2:20 PM - 2:45 PM
Venue:225

Presentation Content:

There are numerous pedagogical benefits of using videos in educational settings, such as facilitating engagement and improving critical thinking skills. The specific task for the Sustainability Marketing students is to create short videos in teams as a term project. The students are guided through the basic steps of developing video content from storyboarding to scripting. This semester long project includes an engaging video competition with a public voting component. These types of hands-on exercises not only provide students with meaningful understanding of the course content and teach them how to apply the knowledge to different contexts, but also teach them how to work in teams, collaborate, and present their ideas to a larger audience.


Presenter(s):

Naz Onel
Stockton University

Naz Onel, Ph.D., M.B.A., is an Assistant Professor of Business Studies at Stockton University. Currently, she teaches Marketing Principles, Consumer Behavior, Sustainability Marketing, and Environment, Business, and Society courses. Her principal areas of research are environmental behaviors of consumers, sustainability marketing, impacts of consumption behavior on environmental well-being, sustainable business strategies, and cross-cultural consumer behavior. Dr. Onel is passionate about exploring environmental behaviors of individuals and changing them toward being more ecologically sensitive and responsible. She serves as a track chair for the upcoming Transformative Consumer Research (TCR) Conference that will take place at Cornell University. Her track session at TCR tries to explore a variety of sustainable consumer behaviors in detail with scholars and researchers all around the world. Dr. Onel’s research has been published in various reputable refereed journals and books.


Ped Tech 3: “Objectifying” Course Videos as a way to increase Familiarity, Understanding and Retention.

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 2:20 PM - 2:45 PM
Venue: 228

Presentation Content:

Online courses, by definition, may seem impersonal. Weekly objective videos, when done correctly, will not only increase the level of personalization in an online course, but will also help to introduce concepts and align material to course level and weekly learning objectives in a way that is effective for students with various learning styles. This presentation will provide both pedagogical and technical information that will help faculty members produce their own effective weekly objective videos.


Presenter(s):

Justin Smith
Berkeley College

Justin Smith is a Senior Instructional Technologist for Berkeley College Online. He uses 20 years of experience to help faculty create engaging multimedia for online courses. Justin was part of a team that won a Bronze Horizon award in 2010 for the Combat Lifesavers distance course. He has a B.A in Communications from the University of Iowa, as well certificates in Film Design, 3d design and animation. Justin is working on a M.S. in Instructional Design and Technology from Walden University.

Jarrod Cecere
Berkeley College

Jarrod Cecere is a Senior Instructional Designer with the Online Faculty Support Team at Berkeley College, where he works with faculty members from the School of Liberal Arts in developing pedagogy and content for online courses. Jarrod has designed and instructed both on-site and online classes in various areas of Psychology for nearly 15 years. He holds a Master’s Degree in Experimental Social Psychology from Saint Joseph’s University.


Planning for Success: Selecting Instructional Materials for All Students

TRACK 1: Student Success/STEM
Time: 2:50 PM - 3:15 PM
Venue: 223

Presentation Content:

Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits state and local entities – including colleges and universities -- from discriminating on the basis of disability. Title III of the ADA likewise sets these same standards for private educational institutions. When selecting materials for instruction, faculty choose thoughtfully, seeking resources that best communicate the concepts and content to be learned. However, some of these resources may not accessible to students with physical or cognitive challenges.

This break out session provides a checklist of questions to be considered during resource selection process. Specific content examples will be examined. Takeaways include an evaluation checklist, a curated list of resources for converting artifacts to accessible formats, and links to recent consent degrees.


Presenter(s):

Linda Feeney
Stockton University

Linda Feeney has a diverse educational background including a B.S.Ed. in music, M.A.Ed. in mathematics and computer science, and Ed.D. in higher education leadership. Her professional experiences have been centered in the education environment evolving from classroom teacher to technology specialist to technology manager. She is currently Director of E-Learning at Stockton University.


New technology of students' assessment and its positive outcomes

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 2:50 PM - 3:15 PM
Venue: 206

Presentation Content:

This presentation introduces a handout, Weekly Questions, incorporated in student evaluation through Canvas - the learning management system - for traditional calculus courses. Outside classroom students solve questions in Weekly Questions and upload their work in Canvas on a weekly basis. The handout activity is an informal assessment tool that can evaluate students’ learning progress and develop effective lessons corresponding to it. Additionally, two additional handouts – Cranium Crunch and Exit Ticket – will be supplemented for traditional developmental and algebra courses. The roles of the handouts are to promote on-time attendance, to improve retention, and to increase students’ responsibility for their own learning.


Presenter(s):

Larry Kwon

I am an instructor of mathematics at Union County College (UCC) for the last four years. I have been teaching various mathematics courses from developmental to advanced mathematics. I am also a moderator for the Student Mathematics League Competition organized by American Mathematical Association of Two-Year Colleges. I am also an adviser for volleyball club. Lastly, I am currently pursuing a Ed.D. in Mathematics Education at Teachers College, in Columbia University.


Performative Hermeneutics: Integrating Hands-on Technology and Literary Study

Track 3: Gamification/Emerging Technologies, Science
Time: 2:50 PM - 3:15 PM
Venue: 227

Presentation Content:

This presentation will focus on three very different content units for an introductory literature class that effectively teach informational literacy and critical thinking via the integration of hands-on technology components. The units include digital humanities, escape room puzzles, and case study projects.

Presenter(s):

Melissa Sande
Union County College

Melissa Sande received her PhD in 2013 in English, General Literature, and Rhetoric from Binghamton University. She teaches African American and introductory literature courses at Union County College.

Beth Ritter Guth
Union County College

Beth Ritter-Guth is the Director of Instructional Design & American Honors at Union County College. She is the 2016 recipient of the NJEdge Charles McMickle Award for Innovation & Leadership. She holds an MA in American Literature and was tenured in Pennsylvania where she focused on American women’s literature, archetypal theory, and technical writing.


Teaching Critical Thinking Skills with Thought Experiments & YouTube

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 2:50 PM - 3:15 PM
Venue: 229

Presentation Content:

Critical thinking is a skill that is highly valued by educators but difficult to teach. This presentation will explore unique teaching methods to promote abstract, critical thinking skills using thought experiments from philosophy and YouTube videos to bring the concepts to life. This activity can have diverse applications in a variety of classes. Attendees will receive samples texts and links that they can use with their students.


Presenter(s):

Joseph Patrick Pascale
Hudson County Community College

Joseph Patrick Pascale is the Writing Center Coordinator at Hudson County Community College. He also teaches English and co-advises the college literary magazine and student newspaper. Pascale serves on the National Tutoring Association board of directors. He holds his Master of Arts in Literature from Centenary University where he wrote his thesis on determinism in the unfinished novels of Franz Kafka. His short fiction has been featured in a variety of publications including Birkensnake and Literary Orphans, and Waldorf Publishing will begin releasing his series of novels “Accurate Accounts of Office Work” next year. For links, visit www.josephpatrickpascale.com


Evaluator Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Online Faculty Assessment

Track 2: Assessment/OER
Time: 3:20 PM - 3:45 PM
Venue: 205

Presentation Content:

Literature suggests that while most institutions utilize assessment tools developed in face-to-face courses in online courses, the action of online teaching holds far more differences than commonalities to face-to-face instructions. Thus, online course instruction assessment tools and processes must be developed with the actualities of distance learning as the objective.

Presenter(s):

Jack Kelnhofer
Ocean County College

Jack Kelnhofer has worked in distance learning and technology for over 25 years. As an online instructor he won the Ocean County College 2014 Teacher of Excellence Award for his work in learning objectives management. Currently, as Dean of e-Learning at Ocean County College and he oversees more than two hundred faculty members doth domestically and globally. His recent work has been focused on researching and developing a series of best practices in online instructor evaluation that matches the unique challenges of today's online environment.

Britni Mastria

Britni Mastria has worked in higher education for over 8 years. Beginning as a writing tutor, her roles in higher education have progressed to online instructor of psychology and education as well as her current position as e-learning administrator. Britni earned her MSEd in Student Affairs and College Counseling at Monmouth University. Her recent work has included authoring a chapter on Middle Eastern college students for the influential higher education administration textbook Today’s College Student. Her recent research interests include existential therapy techniques for aging adults and the application of positive psychology to improve overall wellness.


Implementation of a Bioinformatics Research Program for Undergraduates at Middlesex County College (MCC)

Track 3: Gamification/Emerging Technologies
Time: 3:20 PM - 3:45 PM
Venue: 225

Presentation Content:

In the past decade, the amount of easily accessible bioinformatics data has mushroomed. At Middlesex County College we have initiated a bioinformatics research program, with a focus on problem solving. This talk will cover how students are introduced to various biological and chemical databases, the functionality of each database, and how to navigate through the multiple bioinformatics tools. The talk will also describe designing projects to match the student’s skill level, and preparation of students for oral presentations. We will present how this model can be used to engage students in bioinformatics research.

Presenter(s):

Phalguni Ghosh
Middlesex County College

Brian Lavey
Middlesex County College

Steven Rowley
Middlesex County College


Promoting Retention using Seminar-based Curricula

Track 4: Teaching Innovations
Time: 3:20 PM - 3:45 PM
Venue: 228

Presentation Content:

I will discuss how William Paterson offers faculty seminar curricula concentrating on course design and delivery and intended to promote practices to encourage students to stay engaged, enrolled and successful. Design subjects feature content from Quality Matters as well as creating blended learning courses and universal design for learning disabled students. Delivery features use of social media, active learning and use of open educational resources. Together these tools work to make courses more inviting and useful to modern students, encouraging continued engagement to propel students through their programs to graduation.


Presenter(s):

Robert Harris
William Paterson University

I manage the Center for Teaching and Learning with Technology at William Paterson University, a unit dedicated to helping faculty integrate technology with teaching and learning. My academic background is in American history and I have been at William Paterson for 22 years.