Abstracts

Building E-Books: Best Practices and Lessons Learned Developing Interactive E-books for Technician Education


Track: Learning Solutions
Time:1:10PM - 1:40PM
Venue: Twin Lights I (SLC 107)

Abstract:
E-MATE, E-books and Mobile Apps for Technician Education is a three-year National Science Foundation funded project (ATE DUE 1205113) to develop interactive e-books and targeted mobile apps for technician education. The presentation will highlight best practices and lessons learned while developing interactive e-books in collaboration with the National Center for Supply Chain Technology Education and the National Center for Photonics and Optics Education. The Brookdale Community College based E-MATE team will also demonstrate content developed to date using tools such as iBook Author, Book Widgets, Bookry, and Hype.

Presentation Content:
-- Summary Statement: We will detail our efforts to date to develop interactive e-books and mobile apps for technical education disciplines, provide a survey of the current state of the art in e-books and e-book creation, as well as an update of best practices and lessons learned developing a generic framework of templates, documentation and other material to be shared with other faculty and institutions.
-- Description of activity, project, or solution: In October 2012, Brookdale Community College was awarded a nearly $900,000 three-year National Science Foundation (NSF) Advanced Technological Education (ATE) Project Grant (DUE 1205113) to develop interactive e-books and mobile apps for technical education disciplines.

The goal of this three-year project is to create and disseminate a generic, reusable framework to develop interactive e-books and mobile applications that promote teaching and learning. Added benefits to students include greater choices and cost-savings.

The E-MATE team is working with content providers from several technical disciplines to develop interactive e-books and mobile apps in three phases:
-- Phase 1: Interactivity. Work with content experts in selected technical disciplines to develop interactive e-books, lessons, and modules using iBook Author and complementary widget development tools.
-- Phase 2: Multi-Platform. Adapt iBook e-books for multiple platforms (Amazon, Web)
--Phase 3: Mobile Apps. Develop complementary mobile apps for targeted concepts, not the entire e-book
Brookdale Professor and E-MATE Principal Investigator Mike Qaissaunee and E-MATE Project Administrator Kelly Parr will co-present.
--Outcome: We recently completed year one of this three-year project. We will share lessons learned and interactive content developed, as well as resources for faculty and their institutions to begin developing interactive learning objects from their content.
--Importance or relevance to other institutions: The lessons learned and best practices identified throughout the project will be documented and used to create and share a framework to enable faculty members in other disciplines and institutions to create their own interactive e-books, lessons, and mobile apps and easily put them at student fingertips.

Mike Qaissaunee
mqaissaunee@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College

Bio
Professor Mike Qaissaunee is Chair of the Engineering and Technology Department at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, New Jersey. Mike has been the driving force behind three National Science Foundation (NSF) grants awarded to Brookdale: Building a Pipeline of Cyber Warriors through Education and Competition Offered through Community Colleges, awarded in March 2013; E-MATE, E-books and Mobile Apps for Technician Education, awarded in October 2012; and a 2003 grant to found the Mid-Atlantic Institute for Telecommunications Technologies (MAITT). As Principal Investigator (PI) of MAITT, Mike led the development and implementation of several new courses related to wireless communications, and co-authored a 10th grade Engineering and Technology textbook. Mike has been active at his own campus and around the country in promoting the adoption of new technologies in and approaches to teaching and learning, including: blogs, audio and video podcasts, wikis, mobile computing, and educational gaming and simulation. He has conducted workshops and presented keynote addresses at more than 50 conferences and seminars nationwide on topics including interactive e-books, wireless, wireless security, iPhone programming, and Web 2.0. In December 2013, Qaissaunee was recognized for these efforts by the SANS Institute as a 2013 recipient of the People Who Made a Difference in Security award. Mike is also the recipient of two Educator of the Year awards, including the 2007 Global Wireless Education Consortium (GWEC) Wireless Educator of the Year Award and the 2009 High Impact Technology Exchange Conference (HI-TEC) Educator of the Year Award. The awards recognize his outstanding contributions to advanced technological education at both the local and national levels and significant contributions to the education and training of today's technology workforce. Mike received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware (Newark, DE).


Using Simulation to Promote Critical Thinking in the Health Sciences

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time:2:20PM - 2:50PM
Venue: Navesink I(SLC 216)

Abstract:
This presentation will demonstrate the value of simulation as a teaching strategy in the health sciences. The simulation presented will involve a geriatric female with cognitive problems. It will review how to prepare students for the simulation, how to promote critical thinking and problem solving during the simulation, and how to facilitate a reflective debriefing process after the simulation. Faculty preparation prior to the simulation will also be discussed. Simulation allows students to apply course concepts, practice clinical skills, and utilize critical thinking in a non-threatening environment, and also provides clinical opportunities that are not available in the clinical setting.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement:
We will present a simulation involving an elderly client who has cognitive impairment that was developed by The National League of Nursing (NLN). Three BCC nursing faculty identified the need to improve beginning nursing student's care giving skills when working with elderly patients. We participated in an NLN research project piloting three Geriatric Simulations, patterned after the NLN's Advancing Care Excellence for Seniors program (ACES), designed for use with pre-licensure RN students. The project involved twelve faculty members who prepared students for the simulation, acted out or proctored the scenarios and facilitated debriefing of the scenarios. One hundred and five nursing students participated in the simulations and debrief. Outcome:
Our goals for the project included getting the students to demonstrate therapeutic communication techniques with the confused, elderly patient, identifying changes in the patient's condition, incorporating the nursing process in patient care, identifying legal and ethical obligations in the situations described, communicating appropriately with other members of the healthcare team, and promoting patient safety throughout the scenario. The faculty prepared students for the simulations by reviewing relevant patient record information and assessment tools that would be used during the simulation. Students were assigned various roles during the simulation including primary nurse, secondary nurse, family member, observer and recorder. During the simulation, students were encouraged to use critical thinking skills to assess what was happening with the patient and develop a nursing care plan. The debriefing afterward helped students to evaluate how effective the care was that they provided to their patient and identify areas for improvement. Evaluations of the program by faculty and students were overwhelmingly positive. As we were piloting the scenarios, our evaluation results were shared with the NLN. One area for improvement that was identified was that the amount of paperwork for each scenario was too large for students and faculty to easily review prior to the simulations. Prior to utilizing the scenarios this semester, we will review all the documents for each scenario and try to consolidate the information to make it easier to review and understand.
Importance or relevance to other institutions:
With the baby boomer population aging, there will be an even greater demand for healthcare professionals who are trained to effectively manage the care of the aging client with multiple health problems and cognitive impairment. Students gain valuable skills that can be applied in the clinical situation when they are given the opportunity to role play care for clients with complex needs in a simulation setting. The simulation setting encourages critical thinking in a less stressful environment.

Robin Smith
rsmith@brookdalecc.edu
Linda Hoffman
lhoffman@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College


Bio
Robin Smith:
I am a Registered Nurse who received my Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from the University of Arizona and my Master of Science in Nursing, with an emphasis in Community Health, from the University of Colorado. I have worked in acute care, outpatient care, and homecare settings, as well as working in several management positions. My clinical specialty areas are oncology, hospice and homecare. I have taught in the healthcare field for over 15 years and have been a full time nursing faculty at Brookdale Community College for the last 8 years. Since working at Brookdale, I have taught several online and hybrid courses and have completed a variety of professional development programs on utilizing technology to promote student success. I also successfully completed the four part National League of Nursing Online Teaching and Learning certification program through Indiana University. I have presented at several NJ educational conferences on a variety of topics including creative teaching strategies and student support services.

Linda Hoffman, MSN, RN, CNE, Professor of Nursing, Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, NJ.
I received my Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing from the College of Staten Island, NY and my Masters of Science in Nursing from Hunter College, NY. I have many years of experience in the acute setting, primarily med/surg, as a staff nurse, nursing care coordinator, and clinical educator. Since 1994, I have been a full time faculty member in the nursing department at Brookdale Community College. Being passionate about creating innovative learning environments that fosters achievement of safe nursing practice and student success, I have had the opportunity to teach nursing students at all levels at Brookdale. I have presented at and attended nursing conferences on "Narrative Pedagogy" and "Information Technology", internationally and nationally. Currently, I am a site visitor and participate on the evaluation review panel for the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), having served in that role since 2006.6.


Classroom Redesign: Designing a Smart, Smarter and Smartest Classroom to Meet the Changing Student and Faculty Needs

Track: Learning Solutions
Time:1:45PM - 2:15PM
Venue: Twin Lights I (SLC 106)

Abstract:
Users want learning environments that are flexible and that can promote active learning, classroom technology that can support the multiple devices to make it easier to facilitate student learning and a technological infrastructure that is reliable and robust. We will explore the steps that have been taken at NJIT to begin and design classrooms that can meet the rapidly evolving needs of our students and instructors.

Presentation Content:
Two years ago NJIT's Teaching Learning and Technology (TLT) Committee made a change in how the university approached classroom redesign. This presentation will outline what changes were made and show the impact on recently renovated learning spaces.
One of the driving forces behind this change was the establishment a Learning Spaces subcommittee. This sub-committee contains representatives from the students, faculty and staff who are working with the architects and administrators to ensure that classroom/learning spaces meet our users' instructional/technological needs.
After conducting multiple focus groups three considerations were identified that needed to be addressed during the planning phases. These considerations are classroom technology (e.g. podiums, multiple interactive displays, Smartboards), classroom environment (e.g. flexible furniture, adequate student space, lighting/environmental controls) and technology infrastructure (e.g. power, wireless). Since the formation of this sub-committee we have been able to work with the architects to establish multiple redesigned classrooms that will now serve as the model for almost a dozen new learning spaces currently under construction.

Blake Haggerty
haggerty@njit.edu

Joe Bonchi
bonchi@njit.edu
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Bio
Blake Haggerty is the Director of the Technology Support Center (TSC) at NJIT. The TSC operates the IST Help Desk, Computer Maintenance Facility (CMF), all campus-wide public computing labs as well as provides Instructional Technology support for faculty. Joe Bonchi is the Assistant Director for Instructional Support Services and co-chair for the Classroom Redesign Sub-committee.


Teaching 3D Printed Tactile Learning Objects to Speak

Track: Learning Solutions
Time: 11:05AM - 11:35AM
Venue: Twin Lights II (SLC 107)

Abstract:
3D prints of 2D images obtained by using microscopes, telescopes or satellites can be made into tactile learning objects that can be taught to speak when touched by using capacitive sensing provided by an Arduino-VoiceShield microcontroller. 3D printed tactile learning objects are valuable learning tools for blind or visually impaired students as well as kinesthetic learners who learn better when touching what they learn. How to integrate audio into a 3D printed tactile learning object will be discussed and demonstrated.

Presentation Content:
Summary: This presentation will demonstrate how a 3D printed tactile learning object can be designed so that a fingertip touching a specific spot on the 3D print can be translated to an electrical signal via capacitance sensing so that the popular Arduino microcontroller configured with a Voice-Shield chip can then provide an audio response indicating what the fingertip was touching on the tactile learning object.

Description: PhotoToMesh software was used to make 3D prints from 2D photos of microscope images of cells in mitosis. Thin copper sheets were placed underneath the 3D print so that when a fingertip which naturally carries an electrical charge, touches a particular structure, the capacitance of the copper sheet underneath that area can change causing a signal to be detected by the Arduino-VoiceShield producing an audio response. Many factors can alter the sensitivity of the capacitance sensing thin copper sheet such as thickness of the 3D print, size of the copper sheet and surprisingly also the size of the finger touching the 3D print. Early studies were done using a Piezzo buzzer for audio feedback and while I was touching a thin copper sheet attached to the Arduino microcontroller to test the connectivity by listening to the onset of the sound of the buzzer, my 18 month old granddaughter came over and wanted "up" to see what I was doing. I showed her how I could touch the copper sheet and make the buzzer beep and encouraged her to touch the copper sheet. She did but it didn't beep for her until I increased the sensitivity of the capacitance sensing software which showed me that her smaller finger was not producing enough electrical activity at the sensitivity I initially set. For future use of this technology, I learned that finger size is a factor that would have to be taken into consideration.

Outcome: The outcome of this study currently is much like what I see referred to as fusion cuisine, i.e., foods from different cultures coming together into one dish. I am working with fusion technology, i.e., the bringing together of several technologies such as 3D printing, Arduino-VoiceShield microcontrollers and C++ software programming to make it all work as a tactile learning object which can talk and tell you what structure your finger is touching. Being able to provide audio feedback, i.e., speech, makes these 3D printed tactile learning objects much more valuable as a tool for learning for blind or visually impaired students.

Current state of the project has shown that (1) capacitance sensing can cause an Arduino microcontroller to make a Piezzo buzzer beep and (2) that the VoiceShield chip can speak using the C++ code written for the Sketches (what the Arduino uses for programs). The current effort is to combine the two C++ codes so that the touch can then connect to the VoiceShield chip for sound production.

Importance: Recently, it was announced that Miami University in Oxford Ohio was being sued by a blind student who wants to be a veterinarian and she said that her progress towards a degree was slowed because her access to material she was responsible to learn was not made accessible to her. It is my contention that this is exactly the type of problem that 3D printed tactile learning objects can be designed to solve. I am also convinced that 3D printed tactile learning objects will change what we have accepted in the past as an institution's response to "reasonable accommodations". "Reasonable accommodations" must change as technology changes. So if the future of blind students having access to microscope material is to make 3D prints of what sighted students see, then who is going to make those 3D prints? I would guess that it will be instructional technology staff and library staff will play a role also because copyright concerns are going to have to be satisfied. Think of Merlot and the thousands of digital learning objects they offer for faculty to use. How many of them will have to be re-designed in the form of 3D printed tactile learning objects and how many book publishers will also have to begin providing tactile learning objects to accompany their texts to satisfy new expectations for "reasonable access"? I believe it is important for all of our institutions to recognize what is over the horizon in terms of accessibility and begin to prepare for it before being ordered to do so by the courts.

Michael Kolitsky
makolitsky@utep.edu
The University of Texas at El Paso

Bio
I began teaching with large screen presentation systems using an Apple IIe computer interfaced to a videodisc player in 1984 and in that same year received an NSF grant to explore how computers could be interfaced with external devices so that they could now replace laboratory instrumentation. I was a full professor in Biology at The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and was also the Associate Vice President of Instructional Technology overseeing the construction of an Undergraduate Learning Center designed for large screen presentation and also established a Multimedia Teaching and Learning Center to support and train faculty to teach in technology enhanced classrooms and lecture halls. I have been retired for about 10 years and have been teaching online for UTEP courses such as Histology and Anatomy and Physiology lecture and simulated lab. I also teach a course named the Human Body for Atlantic Cape Community College. My current research interest is in exploring how 3D printing technologies can be used to increase learning opportunities for blind or visually impaired students and also for kinesthetic learners who prefer to touch what they learn.


Follow the Five M's to Training and Developing Faculty to Teach Online

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time:10:30AM - 11:00AM
Venue: Fort Hancock Room (SLC 208)

Abstract:
Faculty who endeavor to teach online at Berkeley College go through a robust, informative training process. This process, the Five M's, are support systems to ensure faculty success through Modeling, Mentoring, Meeting, Maturing, and Maintaining. Each support system involves the use and learning of technology and multimedia that promotes engagement and interaction. The key to successfully on boarding and retaining online faculty is to execute the Five M's process with a significant emphasis on collaboration and the use of technology to humanize the experience. This interactive presentation will provide multiple teaching and learning opportunities for training and developing online faculty.

Presentation Summary
Faculty who endeavor to teach online at Berkeley College go through a robust, informative training process which prepares them to teach online. This process, the Five M's, are support systems in place to ensure faculty success through Modeling, Mentoring, Meeting, Maturing, and Maintaining. Each of the support systems involve the use and learning of technology and multimedia that promotes engagement and interaction.

A twelve week facilitated Online Faculty Training Program introduces faculty to Modeling behavior in the online classroom. Faculty are Mentored by Online Chairs and members of the Office of the Assistant Provost, Online. Social and academic Meetings (in person, online, and via phone and/or video conference) are held throughout the training and on boarding process. Faculty are further Matured in online teaching and learning through guided course preparation (on boarding) where they are invited to bring their content knowledge and passion for teaching to life, explore discipline specific effective practices, and are introduced to School Instructional Designers. Opportunities for maintaining skills and applying effective practices are provided through ongoing professional development activities including webinars and workshops. Faculty cycle through the Five M process to ensure continuous improvement in online teaching and learning.

The key to successfully on boarding and retaining online faculty is to execute the Five M's process with a significant emphasis on the collaboration from Chairs, Deans, Online Faculty Support Team, and the Office of the Assistant Provost, Online and the user of technology to humanize the experience, as much as possible. Together we ensure that our faculty receive the support they need to feel confident in online teaching and learning and establish a sense of community that creates lasting bonds.

As a result of participating in this session presentation, attendees will be able to understand the elements and principles of the 5 M process of online faculty training as it is executed at Berkeley College; identify and learn new strategies for training online faculty; share experiences surrounding the implementation or attainment to meeting any of the 5 M expectations; reflect on how online training can positively impact faculty satisfaction; and learn how new technologies are used and implemented in the online learning environment.

Andie DiMarco
adi@berkeleycollege.edu
Berkeley College

Bio
Andie Johnston DiMarco is the Assistant Dean, Online at Berkeley College. Andie holds a B.A. in English from Rutgers University, an M.A. in English from the University of Maryland College Park, and a M.Ed. in Statistics, Measurement, and Program Evaluation from Rutgers University. She has been teaching for more than twenty years, and started her online teaching career in 1999. She has taught both in the classroom and in online, ITV, and various hybrid formats. She has taught a wide range of classes, including English, quantitative research methods, and technical writing, and at a wide range of levels, from pre-college transition courses to graduate level writing seminars. She has been responsible for the design, development, and delivery of a variety of education programs for both face-to-face and online degree programs at Rutgers University and the University of Maryland. She served as Vice President of Secondary Education Initiatives at Innovative Designs for Education, coordinating diverse school improvement projects for NJ and NY high schools and colleges and training faculty to teach in the new programs.

Andie's passion is for providing access to high-quality higher education to populations that have traditionally been under-served, including first generation and non-traditional college students. Berkeley College is distinguished by the professional experience of its faculty, many of whom continue to work in high-level industry positions while they teach. Educational technology allows these faculty to reach students with whom they would never otherwise have contact.


College Students as Wikipedia Editors: An Engaging Assignment

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
Venue: Atlantic Room (SLC 105)

Abstract:
Turning undergraduates into Wikipedia editors has proven to be a highly engaging and effective learning experience for students in evaluation, attribution, and documentation of sources. The result of a faculty/librarian collaboration, this project combined student engagement with the alignment of learning objectives, learning experiences, and outcomes assessment, all of which played important roles in its success. Tips and resources for using Wikipedia as a teaching tool will enable participants to adapt and construct their own Wikipedia learning experiences.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: This presentation describes the curriculum, instruction, and assessment methodology, and suggests pitfalls and benefits of using Wikipedia as an assignment to teach students about citing sources.

Description of activity: How can information literacy be effectively taught? In addressing this question as a librarian at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), I engaged several professors of technical writing to turn college students into Wikipedia authors with surprisingly positive results. Most librarians agree Wikipedia can be a good place to gain background for a research project, although faculty and librarians usually suggest that it should not be cited in a college term paper. I thought that inviting students to edit Wikipedia might provide a motivation and awareness of the process of evaluating and attributing information to specific sources. This thought led to an exploration of Wikipedia that provided the basis for an assignment for a third year undergraduate technical communication course.

Outcome: The assignment positively affected student motivation and resulted in a successful learning experience, one that integrated research, writing, critical thinking, and presentation skills. All in all, it suggested a new approach to the incorporation of Web technology into instruction in writing and research. The Wikipedia writing assignment employed active learning and fostered student engagement. Learning was largely the result of students discovering the parameters and protocols of a community of authors on their own. The assignment motivated students at first because it seemed "cool" and later because they realized their entry, if well done, might remain out on the web for all to see. It heightened their awareness of the difference between fact and opinion. The purpose and point of citations became clear. It changed their perceptions of the purpose of writing from a static class-assigned exercise to a dynamic source, rich writing activity that used a topic about which they cared deeply, and on which they could publicly contribute to an authoritative article. A rubric was used to evaluate the student work and a statistical analysis of a pre and posttest showed significant gains in information literacy.

Importance: Turning students into active writers on the open web transformed the role of the teacher from judge to coach. It embodied in an authentic way for students to learn the concepts of the accuracy of information, documentation of sources, and peer-review.

Davida Scharf
scharf@njit.edu
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Bio
Davida Scharf has been Director of Reference and Instruction at the New Jersey Institute of Technology since 2004. She has a B.A. from Barnard College in Art and Architectural History, an M.L.S. from Columbia University, and a PhD from Rutgers University Graduate School of Communication and Information where she worked on educational assessment of information literacy. She has worked as a corporate strategic planner, a librarian, and an information management consultant in a variety of settings. Her research interests include critical thinking, information literacy instruction and assessment, program evaluation, knowledge management, and the scholarship of teaching and learning.


New Jersey Cyber Aces Academy at Brookdale: A Collaborative Public/Private Model to Secure the Nation

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time: 10:30AM - 11:00AM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
Responding to the growing number of cybersecurity threats, and a shortage of skilled cybersecurity workers with significant hands-on skills, Brookdale Community College and CounterHack Challenges have established the New Jersey Cyber Aces Academy at Brookdale. The Academy, funded through a two-year National Science Foundation grant and subsidized by the SANS Institute, uses a multi-level, competition-based model to identify talented individuals and provide them with high-level cybersecurity training and skills-building exercises. Serving as a pilot, the Academy at Brookdale is being replicated by six other states. Presenters will provide a project overview and highlight progress, best practices and lessons learned.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: We will detail our efforts to pilot and replicate a model program to develop a new generation of cybersecurity professionals with significant hands-on skills and experience.

Description of activity, project, or solution: The United States is facing a severe shortage of cyber security workers with extensive hands-on experience working on real-world cyber security problems. The shortage of well-trained individuals is so great that the Secretary of Homeland Security calls it her greatest problem, the Director of the National Security Agency says the defense of the nation depends on it, and large- and medium-sized enterprises are frustrated by their inability to hire adequate numbers of appropriately skilled cyber security professionals. In March 2013, Brookdale Community College was awarded a two-year $300,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) Scholarships for Service grant to address this critical need. The project team is piloting an innovative model that aims to build a pipeline of cyber warriors through education and competition offered through community colleges. Brookdale Professor and Principal Investigator Mike Qaissaunee and co-Principal Investigator Ed Skoudis will detail various components of the project, including the competition-based selection process, the intensive training and hands-on skill development, and employer residencies to further refine the skills of these cyber warriors.

Outcome: We will share lessons learned bringing this public/private project to fruition and provide an update on project progress, including the development and training of the inaugural cohort, selection of the year two cohort, and efforts to scale this initiative to additional states.

Importance or relevance to other institutions: Cybersecurity breaches are becoming almost daily occurrences, which speaks to the growing need for skilled cybersecurity workers. This initiative is relevant to all conference attendees, including institutions looking to better secure their networks and faculty interested in teaching cybersecurity.

Ed Skoudis
Founder, Counter Hack Challenges

Mike Qaissaunee
mqaissaunee@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College

Bio
Ed Skoudis is the founder of Counter Hack Challenges, an innovative organization that designs, builds, and operates popular InfoSec challenges and simulations including NetWars, Cyber Quests, and Cyber Foundations. Ed's expertise includes hacker attacks and defenses, the information security industry, and computer privacy issues, with over fifteen years of experience in information security. Ed authored and regularly teaches the SANS courses on network penetration testing (Security 560) and incident response (Security 504), helping over three thousand information security professionals each year improve their skills and abilities to defend their networks. He has performed numerous security assessments; conducted exhaustive anti-virus, anti-spyware, Virtual Machine, and IPS research; and responded to computer attacks for clients in financial, high technology, healthcare, and other industries. Ed conducted a demonstration of hacker techniques against financial institutions for the United States Senate and is a frequent speaker on issues associated with hacker tools and defenses. He has published numerous articles on these topics as well as the Prentice Hall best sellers Counter Hack Reloaded and Malware: Fighting Malicious Code. Ed was also awarded 2004-2012 Microsoft MVP awards for Windows Server Security and is an alumnus of the Honeynet Project. Previously, Ed served as a security consultant with InGuardians, International Network Services (INS), Global Integrity, Predictive Systems, SAIC, and Bell Communications Research (Bellcore). Ed also blogs about command line tips.

Mike Qaissaunee
Professor Mike Qaissaunee is Chair of the Engineering and Technology Department at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, New Jersey. Mike has been the driving force behind three National Science Foundation (NSF) grants awarded to Brookdale: Building a Pipeline of Cyber Warriors through Education and Competition Offered through Community Colleges, awarded in March 2013; E-MATE, E-books and Mobile Apps for Technician Education, awarded in October 2012; and a 2003 grant to found the Mid-Atlantic Institute for Telecommunications Technologies (MAITT). As Principal Investigator (PI) of MAITT, Mike led the development and implementation of several new courses related to wireless communications, and co-authored a 10th grade Engineering and Technology textbook. Mike has been active at his own campus and around the country in promoting the adoption of new technologies in and approaches to teaching and learning, including: blogs, audio and video podcasts, wikis, mobile computing, and educational gaming and simulation. He has conducted workshops and presented keynote addresses at more than 50 conferences and seminars nationwide on topics including interactive e-books, wireless, wireless security, iPhone programming, and Web 2.0.
In December 2013, Qaissaunee was recognized by the SANS Institute as a 2013 recipient of the People Who Made a Difference in Security award. Mike is also the recipient of two Educator of the Year awards, including the 2007 Global Wireless Education Consortium (GWEC) Wireless Educator of the Year Award and the 2009 High Impact Technology Exchange Conference (HI-TEC) Educator of the Year Award. The awards recognize his outstanding contributions to advanced technological education at both the local and national levels and significant contributions to the education and training of today's technology workforce. Mike received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware (Newark, DE).


Promoting retention in first semester nursing students through interactive "Gatherings"

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time: 2:55PM - 3:25PM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
This presentation will describe an innovative retention strategy targeting first semester nursing students at Brookdale Community College. Designed by two nursing faculty, monthly face-to-face and online meetings, known as "Gatherings", have been found to promote success through student-student and faculty–student interaction. Presenters will describe how informal meetings offer students supportive measures which classroom time does not permit. Successful strategies will be shared, including how to attract attendance, and various interventions students reported as helpful in promoting their first semester success. The use of technology to enhance the "Gatherings" will be discussed; quantitative and qualitative outcomes will be shared.

Presentation Summary
Summary Statement:
This presentation will detail the design and implementation of faculty-student "Gatherings" which promoted student success in first semester nursing students.

Description of project:
The Brookdale Community College Nursing Faculty and staff grapple with dynamic internal and external influences while endlessly creating, implementing, and evaluating innovative strategies to address retention and student success. In fall 2011 and spring 2012, respectively, the program completion rates were 72% and 73% (number of students successfully completing program). The completion rates for the first course in the nursing curriculum were worse. For fall 2011, 51% of first semester students successfully completed the first nursing course and in spring 2012, 64% completed the course. In spring 2012, the Nursing Retention Committee conducted a survey of first semester students' perceptions regarding supportive measures and the influence of the support on their success in the first nursing course. A major outcome of the survey revealed that students perceived a lack of faculty interaction and support during their first semester in the program.

The literature is rich with evidence confirming the importance of the faculty-student interaction and its positive effect on student retention and success (McEnroe-Pettite, 2011; Shelton, 2003; Stokes, 2003). Shelton (2003) found that students who persisted in a nursing program from their first clinical nursing course to the final semester had significantly greater perceived faculty support, in terms of both psychological and functional support, than students who withdrew either voluntarily or because of academic failure (p. 74).

This presentation describes the development, implementation and evaluation of an innovative strategy designed by two nursing faculty to promote student success through faculty-student and student-student interaction in monthly "Gatherings". The measurable outcomes of this project include increasing completion rates of first semester nursing students and creating a sustainable retention initiative that can be implemented college-wide. Data was collected though pre and post "gatherings" surveys (open and closed-ended questions) and by completion rates of fall 2013 and spring 2014 first semester nursing students. The project is not limited to nursing students; and can be developed in most academic divisions of NJ Community Colleges.

Methods:
Monthly "Gatherings" (face-to-face and virtual) involving faculty and first semester nursing students will be implemented beginning in September 2013 and continued throughout the academic year.
Ongoing communication (faculty-student, student-student) in between "Gatherings" facilitated through the use of social media; the college's learning management system; Student Nurses Association Facebook page; through class and online email
Surveys were administered to "Gatherings" members before and after the semester to obtain qualitative feedback.
The completion rates of students who attend one or more "Gathering" during fall 2013 or spring 2014 are assessed and outcomes (quantitative and qualitative data) will be presented to college-wide community.
Faculty will develop resource materials (handbook) detailing "Gatherings" to be used for retention efforts for college-wide implementation of "Gatherings" (sustainability)

Each "Gathering" includes psychological and functional supportive measures: --Anxiety reduction techniques (guided imagery, online google images) --Test anxiety, review of program support tools, how to navigate the college's learning management system (newly introduced) --Pre-reading textbooks, PQ4R reading techniques- put students in pairs to practice techniques --Time management tips, practice NCLEX questions, exam–taking techniques --Faculty from other courses and upper level students came to offer words of advice and say hello (literature supports the positive impact resulting from student - student support. --Online "Gatherings" using Adobe connect software- mimicked face to face "Gatherings"

Planning --Plan for guest attendees --Determine faculty's role for each gathering --Schedule dates and reserve rooms --Attend training for Adobe Connect (for online synchronous meetings). --Investigate social media options for communications between "gathering" meetings. --Determine marketing strategies

Outcome and Accomplishments:
The goal of the "Gatherings" was to increase completion rates of first semester nursing students with a long term goal of improving overall program completion rates. The completion rate 92.5% for those who attended the "Gatherings" is remarkable considering past completion rates. We also hoped that the students would experience both psychological support and functional support through the "Gatherings." Achievement of this goal is evident in the comments below under qualitative data.

Quantitative data:
This is reflected in completion rates for first semester nursing students. Completion rates in fall 2011 were 51% and in spring 2012 completion rates were 64%. Completion rates for fall 2012 were 71% and in spring 2013 they were 85%. Completion rates after implementation of the "Gatherings" in fall 2013 was 90%. Data for spring 2014 is pending.
A total of 40 students attended "Gatherings", either face to face or online in fall 2013. Of these students, 37 completed the first semester nursing course, for a completion rate of 92.5%.

Qualitative data:
This was obtained utilizing an online survey and also by using Twitter, a social media vehicle. Comments were rich in description of the psychological and functional supportive measures valued by students who participated in the "Gatherings".
Examples of Twitter responses to the question:
What were your thoughts about your first "Gatherings" meeting?
-The meeting was a very good experience; can't wait for the next one
-Great information and helped calm the nerves
-It was nice meeting other students interested in making a difference in their study habits

Responses to specific survey questions included:
What specific aspects of the "Gatherings" did your find helpful?
-The discussion about what can we do to ease our tension during the test and some strategies that can help us to study more effectively
-Meeting with advanced students to learn the ins and outs of achieving success in the program. It's a way to ask questions and give suggestions in a more relaxed setting
-The friendly environment, In what ways did you feel supported in the nursing program as a result of the "Gatherings"?
-There are a lot of students in the same boat as you. It was the perfect way to form "study buddies" from students who may not be in the same section as you. Also the professors gave MANY helpful strategies.
-Meeting different instructors for future courses and their warm welcomes helped ease a lot of anxiety about being the "new kid on the block"

Successes:
The completion rate of 92.5% for those who attended the "Gatherings" was a stellar success.
One surprising success was the number of students who attended the "Gatherings." The first "Gathering" was attended by 40 of the 98 students in the cohort with the last "Gathering" of the semester leveling off at around 20 students. The overwhelmingly positive feedback from students was also a hallmark of success. In response to the question, "What have you learned as a result of the "Gatherings," this comment epitomizes a successful outcome: I have learned that the professors are there to help you succeed. That there are students with the same strengths/weaknesses as you that you can team up with.

Failures:
One failure was our underestimation of the students' use of technology and social media. We thought that the online cohort would embrace the use of an online meeting. The same percentage of online students used the Adobe Connect technology as the percentage of face to face students who attended the "Gatherings." Also, very few of the students responded to Twitter messages asking for feedback from each gathering. When asked what technology they preferred to communicate with, most of the students opted for the current Learning Management System used for the course.

Importance or relevance to other institutions:

This project aligned with the institutional goals of Inspiring Student Success and Maximizing Resources. The goal of the "Gatherings" was to increase completion rates of first semester nursing students through the development of a sustainable retention initiative that can be utilized in other academic divisions of this college, as well as other academic institutions. Increasing completion rates is a continual challenge for Community Colleges. Through development of a handbook that outlines the purpose and structure of "Gatherings", this resource can be implemented by faculty to enhance completion rates. Faculty could utilize 1 office hour a month to create a "Gathering" to support students in a way that cannot be achieved in the classroom. This support has benefits in terms of student's perceptions of learning, as well as in completion rates.

Bonnie Ross
bross@brookdalecc.edu

Helen Heinmets
hheinmets@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College


Bio
Bonnie Ross MA, RN, CNE, an Assistant Professor of Nursing & Department Chair at Brookdale Community College has over 30 years of experience in medical-surgical/critical care nursing and case management. For the past 12 years, she has enjoyed the role of nursing faculty member and promoting student success. She is currently teaching and learning with beginning nursing students, while chairing the nursing department. A past presenter at NJ Edge.net, Bonnie is currently pursuing an Ed.D in Educational Leadership through Rowan University.

Helen Heinmets MSN, RN, CPAN is an Assistant Professor of Nursing at Brookdale Community College. She has over 30 years of experience in the areas of critical care and nursing management. She is currently teaching last semester nursing students with a focus on Neurosensory content and Leadership and Management skills. She has taught numerous online classes and has crafted the nursing department's first travel abroad course to London.


Collaborate and the Flipped Classroom:Perfect Together

Track: Learning Solutions
Time:1:45PM - 2:15PM
Venue: Twin Lights II (SLC 107)

Abstract:
Collaborate is the primary tool in the flipped classroom instructional format. The flipped classroom model is based on the practice whereby students watch pre-recorded lectures on collaborate, answer questions that are posted within the videos and ask questions which are answered by the teacher and fellow classmates. The students use collaborate to ask and answer questions, as well as discuss concepts from the content presented, critically analyze case studies and problem solve issues related to their own classrooms, all of which are used by the teacher to design and direct ongoing instruction. Teaching and learning is enhanced through collaborate.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement:
The presenters will demonstrate the use of collaborate as an effective tool to facilitate the flipped classroom model of instruction.

Description of Activity, Project or Solution:
The School of Education at Richard Stockton College of New Jersey has a significant graduate enrollment, most of whom are full time teachers and part time students. The faculty recognizes that the focus of graduate work is on the application, analysis and evaluation of new concepts, rather than acquiring the basic knowledge through traditional lectures. Knowing this, faculty designed course delivery where students watch recorded lectures on collaborate and respond to teacher's questions embedded within the recording (Brame, 2013).
In addition, students work with their classmates in teams to ask and answer each other's questions, discuss issues related to the content, analyze case studies and problem solve day to day classroom situations they face with their own students. All of which occurs in collaborate classrooms. The teacher listens to the students' discussions and responds to their questions; all of which is completed before the weekly class. Based on the students' comments and responses, the teacher designs classroom activities that reflect the course content and opportunities to apply the concepts in real life situations. Since students have reviewed the lecture and content before class and asked and answered questions, the scheduled class time emphasizes student led hands-on activities as they apply, analyze and evaluate new concepts (Berrett, 2012).

The flipped classroom model has evolved over the past few years as procedures have been fine-tuned to better present the course content. Extensive consultation with technology specialists at the college has provided training and ongoing support for the flipped classroom concept. Students' feedback is used to make adjustments that ensure a smooth transition from the traditional lecture structure to the video recordings. Some students needed several training sessions before becoming comfortable. The teacher increased the students' ease in using collaborate by making sure that within each team, there was at least one student who was technologically experienced and could guide those who needed the support as well as the teacher meeting for review sessions. Opportunities for practice were provided either in class or out of class when students scheduled times to log in independent of the teacher.
Teacher preparation time is greatly increased with the flipped classroom. Time management is crucial because unless students receive feedback before the class, the material covered in class lacks relevancy for them. In fact, all students' responses were due at noon the day before the scheduled class so that feedback was received before class. Often, the teacher uses time at the beginning of class to revisit issues that all students would benefit from. As challenges emerge, solutions are forthcoming but the value of the flipped classroom as student learning and engagement is increased, is well worth the extra time and effort.

Outcomes:
There is little research, quantitative and qualitative, that supports or negates the effectiveness of the flipped classroom but the results the presenter has seen dissuades from discontinuing its use and reverting back to the lecture format. The presenter has considered anecdotal comments from students that include many of the principles of the flipped classroom such as:
-- More consistent and regular teacher feedback;
--Students learn from each other;
--More student engagement and responsibility for their own learning
--Smooth transition because of amount of exposure and ease in using social media;
-- Self-paced learning as students can start and stop the videos as needed;
-- Classwork was more meaningful because of application, analysis, evaluation and problem solving; and
-- Students worked together to learn; the teacher acted as the coach.
(Goodwin & Miller, 2013)

If selected to participate in the 2014 Faculty Showcase, the presenters will show audience members examples of the flipped classroom that are on blackboard course platform as collaborate recordings. Anecdotal information from students will be shared that focus on the value of the recorded collaborate lectures, collaborate discussion groups and the added responsibility students realize for their own learning. In addition, presenters will relay issues with the flipped classroom such as transition for some students from live lectures to recordings and using technology as a learning tool. The amount of grading week by week is extensive and time consuming for the teacher but the assessment data and qualitative information from students assist in fine-tuning the instruction to meet the students' needs.
Importance and Relevance:
The flipped classroom provides opportunities for students to embrace their own learning while facilitating the learning of others. Faculty endeavor to enhance their instructional practice by increased student engagement in hands-on activities that connect the new information with previous knowledge. Students use what is learned from the recordings to create, explore and practice with fellow students so that after class, they take what they have practiced to their own classrooms (Chung, 2014).

Shelly Meyers
shelly.meyers@stockton.edu

Linda Feeney
linda.feeney@stockton.edu
The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey

Bio
Shelly Meyers is an Associate Professor of Education at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Her primary teaching responsibilities are graduate level teacher preparation courses in special education, however she also teaches freshman basic skills reading for the General Studies program. Dr. Meyers's research interests include alternative methods of instructional delivery through technology and situated learning principles, life skills training and its impact on transition for individuals with disabilities and coaching in the classroom to maximize students' acquisition of common core curricular standards.

Linda Feeney is Director of E-Learning at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. Her professional experiences have been centered in the education environment, evolving from classroom teacher to technology specialist to technology manager. Her current research interests include technology-assisted language acquisition, online course accessibility, and the impact of social media on instruction.


Securing the Institution by Engaging the Campus Community through Security Awareness Training

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time:11:105AM - 11:35AM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
Our institutions invest significant resources in consultants, firewalls, security appliances, and other technologies to secure our networks. Unfortunately all of these efforts are wasted when employees remain susceptible to social engineering, Phishing scams, weak passwords, and a general lack of understanding of potential security risks. This is further exacerbated by the BYOD phenomenon whereby employees may bring infected devices into the organization. In this presentation, we detail a security awareness initiative developed in collaboration between a faculty member teaching network security and the Executive Director of Office of Information Technology.

Presentation Content:
-- Summary Statement: In this presentation, we provide an overview and details of a new employee awareness training program.
--Description of activity, project, or solution: This unique initiative is a collaboration between a longtime faculty member and the Executive Director of the colleges IT services vendor. The vendor brings knowledge of the colleges IT infrastructure, its' ongoing security efforts, and the challenges faced in securing the institutions' network and critical resources. The faculty member brings knowledge and expertise within the field of network security, as well as credibility within the college community that will serve to increase the effectiveness of this security awareness training program.

Security awareness needs to be a comprehensive, ongoing effort. To this end we propose to develop a multi-faceted security awareness program. This will include materials for the colleges' new employee orientation program, as well as bi-weekly communication regarding important security topics and a series of one-hour security awareness workshops. Whenever possible, we leverage the availability of free and open source materials from a number of security vendors. The focus will be on brief, often topical information that will delivered via a variety of modalities (text, audio, video and interactive learning objects) and will serve to raise the awareness of employees regarding security and their role in securing the institution.

Brookdale Professor and Mike Qaissaunee and the Executive Director of Office of Information Technology Camille Shelley will co-present.
-- Outcome: As this is a new initiative, we expect to be able to share our overarching plan, content that has already been disseminated, future topics, feedback from the campus community, and future plans.
-- Importance or relevance to other institutions: As security breaches are in the news almost daily, it's more important than ever that academic institutions secure their networks and access to the resources. A critical piece of a comprehensive defense-in-depth strategy is to educate employees regarding security threats and how to protect themselves and the organization.

Camille Shelley
cshelley@brookdalecc.edu

Mike Qaissaunee
mqaissaunee@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College

Bio
Camille Shelley serves as the Executive Director of the Office of Information Technology at Brookdale Community College located in Lincroft, New Jersey. Camille provides management of strategic and tactical activities to ensure college satisfaction, technical delivery, and resource management. Camille's role is responsible for managing the day-to-day operations of Brookdale's Office of Information Technology department including; directing staff, who support administrative and/or academic computing, networking, user services, telecommunications and other information technology functions. Ms. Shelley also advises the college on the status of technologies at the institution relative to the college's strategic goals and objectives.

A major focus of Camille's role is to ensure the security of the college's network, sensitive data, and educate end-users of best practices related to operating in an electronic world. Recent security-focused initiatives led by Camille at Brookdale include implementing identity management, along with an enterprise-wide, password management tool. Camille leads an internal IT team focused on infrastructure security, data security, vulnerability testing and mitigation of internal and external threats. Camille received her undergraduate degree in Business Administration from Faulkner University (Montgomery, AL) and an MBA with an IS concentration from Troy University (Troy, AL).

Mike Qaissaunee
Professor Mike Qaissaunee is Chair of the Engineering and Technology Department at Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, New Jersey. Mike has been the driving force behind three National Science Foundation (NSF) grants awarded to Brookdale: Building a Pipeline of Cyber Warriors through Education and Competition Offered through Community Colleges, awarded in March 2013; E-MATE, E-books and Mobile Apps for Technician Education, awarded in October 2012; and a 2003 grant to found the Mid-Atlantic Institute for Telecommunications Technologies (MAITT). As Principal Investigator (PI) of MAITT, Mike led the development and implementation of several new courses related to wireless communications, and co-authored a 10th grade Engineering and Technology textbook. Mike has been active at his own campus and around the country in promoting the adoption of new technologies in and approaches to teaching and learning, including: blogs, audio and video podcasts, wikis, mobile computing, and educational gaming and simulation. He has conducted workshops and presented keynote addresses at more than 50 conferences and seminars nationwide on topics including interactive e-books, wireless, wireless security, iPhone programming, and Web 2.0.

In December 2013, Qaissaunee was recognized by the SANS Institute as a 2013 recipient of the People Who Made a Difference in Security award. Mike is also the recipient of two Educator of the Year awards, including the 2007 Global Wireless Education Consortium (GWEC) Wireless Educator of the Year Award and the 2009 High Impact Technology Exchange Conference (HI-TEC) Educator of the Year Award. The awards recognize his outstanding contributions to advanced technological education at both the local and national levels and significant contributions to the education and training of today's technology workforce. Mike received his undergraduate and graduate degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Delaware (Newark, DE)


Use of Camtasia Relay and Google Forms to Teach and Assess Presentations in Online Classes

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time:2:20PM - 2:50PM
Venue: Molly Pitcher Room (SLC 104)

Abstract:
The need was identified for students to create and deliver effective digital presentations and accurately assess making assessment and course evaluation more automated. This project has put in place a series of instructional tools that use Relay recording paired with Google forms to gather student feedback with samples of varying levels of accomplishment. Expert feedback is then provided and students are asked to produce similar products. Then, students and experts provide feedback in a group-sourcing fashion before a summative task is given. Relay samples, criteria for assessing presentations, the automated collection system, instructional materials and overall results will be presented.

Presentation Content:
Summary:
The need was identified for students to create and deliver effective digital presentations and accurately assess making assessment and course evaluation more automated. This project has put in place a series of instructional tools that use Relay recording paired with Google forms to gather student feedback with samples of varying levels of accomplishment. Expert feedback is then provided and students are asked to produce similar products. Then, students and experts provide feedback in a group-sourcing fashion before a summative task is given. Relay samples, criteria for assessing presentations, the automated collection system, instructional materials and overall results will be presented. During the presentation, the set of criteria will be given as a handout and a sample shown so that attendees can see how the form might be used. Then the presentation will briefly review the development process and demonstrate the tools that were developed in the context of the instructional design using the Moodle interface from NJIT. Sample student products from the various stages of the task will be shown to demonstrate the desired improvements.

Description of activity, project, or solution:
Research has shown that students tend to attack tasks without looking at instructional materials in an online course. If samples are given, they are often used as templates or instead of close reading of task descriptions. In addition many students are unable to accurately and honestly assess the quality of their own work or that of others making peer-review difficult especially when judging classmates in open forums. Feedback often lacks detail and only touches on gross elements with a lack of insight that an expert instructor might provide. For oral reporting these issues are even more problematic since many students have never been taught how to present effectively and often measure themselves against the others they encounter rather than a quality example agreed upon by experts. In addition, few students have been exposed to the idea of recording their own presentation for review prior to final submission so drafting rarely happens.

Dr. Lipuma was charged with the redesign of the culminating capstone course for NJIT which is intended for all students to demonstrate accomplishment of General University Requirements (GUR), he identified the need to have a means to teach, assess and capture for evaluation purposes student oral presentations. He worked with Blake Haggerty, Assistant director for Instructional Design on similar elements for NJIT's Technical Writing course and together they developed basic tools to accomplish this. Research in curriculum and instructional design shows that alignment of task, resources and assessments will provide learners better and more effective experiences in online learning while allowing them to work on tasks independently. In addition, the ability to move through resources at their own pace and in their own order makes this alignment even more important for learner mastery and accomplishment of tasks.
Based on the work completed in the technical writing class, a basic structure for how student work can be captured using Camtasia relay was known. In addition, that course provided experience with how to develop aligned tasks with sufficient resources and detailed instructions for students to use in the online format.

The first step was to identify the criteria to be applied to oral reports. And upload them to the Google form. Once this basic set-up was complete, a task was designed in which students would create a 1-minute Digital Video Business Card (DVBC) using PowerPoint as the basis which then was recorded using Camtasia Relay. These videos were to be assess using the Google forms. The first iteration for the course development was implemented in a face-to-face course in fall 2013 with the assistance of Jenna Walther, a graduate students in the NJIT MS Professional and Technical Communication program MSPTC.

Based on the feedback from students and observational data from Dr. Lipuma, the material was refined and moved to a fully online version in a winter 2013 session of technical Writing. Additional resources were added and sample DVBCs paired with the automated Google form to assess the effectiveness of this tool.

This project grew out of the idea that in an online course, the instructional design could be structured in a way to allow the above issues to be overcome while providing students the ability to learn to assess themselves and one another more accurately aligned with what experts might say about their work. This demonstrated the proof of concept for the tool in the instructional design as well as provided more data on the missing elements.

The instructional design was refined and inserted into the 2014 online capstone with 62 students. Based on the data from this pilot, final revisions will be made and the system rolled out to a broader set of courses in need of instruction on and assessment of oral reporting at NJIT. The current design for the oral presentation task is as follows:
1. Students evaluate a sample of a flawed presentation using the google form and then discuss and compare it to a good presentation in an open forum.
2. Students review 6 sample DVBC: 3 for presenter quality at low, middle, and high attainment and 3 for presenter and visual aids at those same 3 levels.
3. Students prepare their own DVBC for formal grading
4. Students are asked to create a Camtasia relay walkthrough of their final ePortfolio
5. Students are asked to make quantitative ratings of the Camtasia relay walkthrough using the form and qualitative feedback about why they rated this and how it might be improved.
6 Finally, students submit refined DVBC and walkthrough with the ePortfolio as evidence for their attainment of a portion of the Humanities GUR competencies.

Outcome:
The outcomes from this project are the refined set of criteria, the working samples and instructional design. It is too early to have quantitative data on the effectiveness of the system but It is clear that students viewed the samples and based on the task requirements went back to view resources in order to improve their work. From student reflections, many reported needing to make multiple recordings and recognized the need for more time to plan the presentation. In addition some students noted that they needed to go back and revise the PowerPoint to better align the recording with the slides. Several students noted that hearing their own voice was significant in their desire to rerecord and improve the work.

One outcome of the project was that the work submitted highlighted the need for better samples and description of the expert feedback. Along these lines more instructional materials to calibrate student and instructor expectations is needed. Once the larger sample has been assessed refinement of the task can be done to identify student needs for support.

Importance or relevance to other institutions:
Any institution or person who wishes to capture oral presentation as part of a class or for evaluation purposes in an electronic portfolio will be interested in this work. In addition, this material can be used by anyone at any level to aid instruction on oral presentations, Creation of effective slides, and how to record these for others. Many people may also benefit from the way the system is automated in order to handle a large class size while still providing feedback from experts. This ties to the idea that if you can make students better assessors of their own work and that of classmates, the feedback given in open forums or peer review will be more meaningful and more effectively applied to drafts of work. This is an essential aspect of a wide range of work.

James Lipuma
lipuma@njit.edu

Jenna Walther
New Jersey Institute of Technology

Bio
Dr. Lipuma is the director of the Curriculum, Learning, and Assessment studies (CLAS)-Project at the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) and has been the Teacher Education Programs Coordinator for NJIT since 2004. He holds a BS in Chemical Engineering from Stanford University, MS in Environmental Policy Studies and PhD in Environmental Science from NJIT and a post-doctoral Masters of Education in Curriculum and Teaching focused in Science Education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He supports all NJIT teacher education initiatives and has overseen several curriculum redesign projects for secondary and university-level programs. Since 2008 he has led the Rutgers-Newark Urban Teacher Education Program curricular redesign project to meet the requirements of TEAC accreditation and State of New Jersey Department of Education certification as well as improve the educational experience for those students enrolled in the pre-service Urban Teacher Education Program. He has completed several curriculum redesigned projects at NJIT including the update of the technical Writing course to include ePortfolio creation and course evaluation. Currently he is redesigning the Culminating Capstone course that is meant to demonstrate senior accomplishment of the Humanities general University requirements for all students graduating NJIT

Jenna Walther is pursuing a Masters in the NJIT MS Professional and Technical Communication (MSPTC) program. She holds a BA in English from Rutgers University with a teacher certification in English Language Arts. Her research interest focuses upon instructional design and assessment of student learning in secondary and post-secondary classrooms. She has completed several projects related to online learning evaluation.


Digital Hippies or Cyber Thugs: The Rise of Hactivism on the College Campus

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time:1:10PM - 1:40PM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
Hactivism is the use of hacking to promote social agendas. College students, frustrated by antiquated forms of protest, are turning to hacking as a means of self-expression. This presentation will provide information about identifying markers of various groups, the potential campus impact, and methods to promote a positive culture of white hat hacking.

Presentation Summary
Summary Statement: This interactive and informational presentation will outline various terms associated with hactivism on campus.

Description: Participants will learn about Anonymous, LulzSec, Bit coin, The Jester, and other persons/groups involved in Hactivism. They will learn the differences between white, grey, and black hat hacking. Activities will include a small game, discussion, and handouts.

Outcome: Participants will look toward their own institutions and identify hactivist behavior.

Colleges are ripe for hactivism, and it is imperative that educators are able to identify behavior and act accordingly.

Beth Ritter-Guth
beth.ritter-guth@ucc.edu
Union County College

Bio
Beth Ritter-Guth is the Director of Instructional Design at Union County College. She helps faculty identify new technologies to use in the classroom and is a specialist in web technologies, ethical practices for instructors, gamification, virtual worlds, and gaming. She has earned several teaching awards, and her benchmark work using virtual worlds to teach college literature has been documented by The Chronicle of Higher Education, America Online, and USA Today.


Deconstructing Social Media for the Adult Learner

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 2:55PM - 3:25PM
Venue: Trustees Conference Room (SLC 209)

Abstract:
Seton Hall University has developed a successful certificate in Social Media that addresses the needs of nontraditional students who are seeking to reinvent themselves or simply update their technology skills. This five part certificate program engages participants to develop a social media strategy, gain exposure to various tools, and use analytics to measure success. This presentation will share how the certificate was developed, the team approach that the instructors use to provide synergy across workshops, and ways in which the needs of the adult learner are addressed.

Presentation Content:
Seton Hall University has developed a successful certificate in Social Media offered through its Division of Continuing Education. This presentation will share how the certificate was developed, organization of the various workshops that make up the certificate, and strategies for meeting the needs of nontraditional students.

The Certificate in Social Media was first constructed from a series of workshops, developed by the Instructional Design team at Seton Hall, that were offered to faculty. In 2006 the interest in social media tools for disseminating information and supporting learning communities sparked the interest of many educators on the Seton Hall campus and the first workshops, focused on blogs, wikis and Facebook, were created. The success of these offerings, and the addition of workshops focused on other tools, such as Twitter, caught the attention of Continuing Education administrators who realized a wider need, prompting the development of the Certificate in Social Media.

Over the past three years the Certificate in Social Media has been taught by Seton Hall faculty and members of the Instructional Design team. The topics have expanded since the original faculty development workshops to include social media strategy, additional tools such as Pinterest and LinkedIn and assessment. There are two main challenges that the instructors face in supporting this program. First, they must keep current on the myriad of changes that take place daily on these various social media platforms. Second, they must meet the learning needs of nontraditional students. While some of the participants who enroll in the program work for organizations or own their own businesses, many are seeking new employment opportunities and need a primer to social media. In addition, many of these individuals are not comfortable with technology and also need basic computer training. It is important for the instructors to be able to deliver the technical instruction in ways that support a variety of skills levels, while at the same time making the content relevant to the needs of adult learners.

This session is relevant for anyone who has the responsibility of offering similar workshops to their campus community or beyond. The organization and sequencing of the content has been refined over the many times that the certificate has been offered. The Certificate in Social Media has evolved into a very successful program that reaches maximum enrollment each time that it is offered. Since this is an introduction to Social Media, a second certificate in Advanced Social Media has been developed and will be offered for the first time this spring.

Danielle Mirliss
danielle.mirliss@shu.edu

Joseph Martinelli
Joseph.martinelli@shu.edu
Seton Hall University

Bio
Danielle Mirliss an Associate Director at Seton Hall University's Teaching, Leaning and Technology Center. She is responsible for overseeing the Instructional Design and Training team in a variety of faculty and student support initiatives. She has been part of the Instructional Design team at Seton Hall since 2002 and has a broad range of experience in mobile computing, pen-based computing, course redesign, online learning, virtual worlds and assessment. Before coming to Seton Hall, she was an Instructional Designer at The Distance Learning Project, an online division of Columbia University.
Danielle holds an Ed.D in Instructional Technology and Media from Teachers College, Columbia University. She also received her Ed.M. from the same program and her M.A. in Industrial and Organizational Psychology from New York University.

Joe Martinelli specializes in the area of Electronic Educational Technologies with a focus on the integrating of electronic technologies into the curriculum, multimedia technologies, web page design, graphic communications, production of instructional materials, and current issues in education. Previously he had served as the associate director of Seton Hall's CEAS program, an 18-Credit Accelerated Teacher Certification Program. Committee work at Seton Hall includes: TLTR Subcommittee, Emerging Technologies, 2007 - Present; Faculty IT Committee, 2001 - Present; Oral Communication Proficiency, 2006 , TLTR Subcommittee, Evaluation & Assessment:, 2006 - 2007, IT NCATE Social Consciousness Committee, 2005 - 2007, and Copyright Task Team. 2004 - 2005.
He has taught courses in journalism and mass communication at William Paterson University, sports public relations and intermediate composition at FDU- Madison and public relations at Seton Hall University. Areas of interest include digital storytelling, podcasting, electronic gaming in education and how to use technology and literacy to enhance learning. Prior to becoming a full-time faculty member at Seton Hall in 2001, Martinelli spent 15 years as an administrator at William Paterson University, working in University Relations. He specialized in Athletic Communications, Web Design, Multimedia Production and Publications. During his time at William Paterson, he received several citations of excellence for his feature writing and web design abilities.


Verdict Please: iChoose iPads! Now About the Apps...

Track: Learning Solutions
Time: 10:30AM - 11:00AM
Venue: Twin Lights I (SLC 106)

Abstract:
Without content, there is no such thing as technology integration. Really? Without students, not their teachers, being fully and willfully engaged with the technology, technology integration isn't taking place. Really? In response to last year's iSee... iThink... iLearn... iTeach... iPad? iChoose! NJEDge presentation, 35 pre-service teachers made the effort to prove it with iPads (and iPhones) being the technology of choice. Really? The result - a team effort yielding awesome Apps across 6 content areas and many grade levels. Really? Come learn the process and be the first to see the results. They might surprise you. Really!!!

Presentation Content:
This presentation provides a practitioner view of how novice through expert iPad users took a simple process, ran with it, and then shared the most awesome technology integration results with other pre-service and in-service teachers for the greatest impact. Within this presentation, the sharing continues.

As an iPad recipient of Georgian Court University's 2012 iPad Initiative, my research is in its second year of investigation into how best to model to pre-service teachers the correct use of iPads (and other tablets) in the classroom based upon content areas. Having spent two semesters working intensely with pre-service teachers, the original problem of "modeling how to use iPads to teach with and how to best allow students to learn with them" has morphed into "I want to use iPads to teach with and for my students to learn with, but what about the iPad Apps?"

Thirty-five pre-service teachers, many of whom were iPhone users, looked closely at an array of iPad Apps to see which were most content-appropriate to integrate into the classrooms. There was no shortage of availability; however, reviewing Apps of interest and selecting the best ones required time on their part to investigate the quality of each selection. Similar to how teachers previously had to evaluate websites, the pre-service teachers found it necessary to explicitly identify the criteria by which selection decisions would be made. Whereas modeling was the method of choice in learning how to effectively use the iPad for teaching and learning, evaluation strategies and alignment with the curriculum quickly took center stage for the decision making process. It was here that pre-service teachers moved beyond practicing skills to critically thinking through what they would teach versus how they would supplement that content. The results surprised even them.

Each of the 35 teachers completed a survey detailing their learning experience. The data suggests that their interactions with the iPad changed their perspective regarding the power of technology and how teachers can select tools that truly supplement their teaching efforts. The data will be displayed in charts and supplemented by the qualitative comments of the pre-service teachers so presentation participants can see and hear the results for themselves.

The relevancy of this proposed presentation is that it does not matter whether you are a pre-service teacher, an in-service teacher, faculty in higher education, a librarian, an administrator, or an IT professional. The use of smartphones, iPads, and tablets in general are increasing exponentially. It's OK to use Apps for entertainment, however, locating and selecting those that promote active learning is an experience that open doors of opportunity for teachers, students, and anyone committed to personal growth. Doing it well is an art that will be shared.

Gloria Edwards
gedwards@georgian.edu
Georgian Court University

Bio
I have taught Instructional Technology and technology-based courses as part of my full-time faculty duties for the past 19 years. My research interest focuses on the use of technology tools, particularly digital and web-based ones, and how the ability or inability to effectively use them impacts the attitudes and productivity of diverse groups of learners (traditional and non-traditional) in higher education and the workplace.


Gaming and Curriculum Integration

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time:2:55PM - 3:25PM
Venue: Atlantic Room (SLC 105)

Abstract:
This workshop will provide a framework for exploring the role of games as pedagogical instruments--tools for teaching and learning in the classroom. Gaming will be discussed as a social and cultural phenomenon that influences the way students think and process information. Existing classroom practices will be presented as discussion for current and future design, implementation, and research in the field.


Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: The focus of this presentation are the principles of gamification in teaching and learning. What we are presenting is our research in gamification and how it manifests in the K-12 curriculum.

Description of activity:
As a professor in the graduate course Introduction to Distance Learning in the department of Educational Technology at New Jersey City University, I introduce the concept of games as pedagogical instruments--tools for teaching and learning in the classroom. For the culminating activity, students develop K-12 curriculum units in which they integrate a multi-user virtual game. In addition, our doctoral students discuss the concept in the course Cross-Discipline Studies in Technology. One doctoral candidate, Matt Farber, integrated several games and gamified concepts in his middle school classrooms. In addition, he expanded his study of games and gamification through work with the Institute of Play and other various publishers in the field. He has since beta tested new games and worked with publishers to test games in his classroom.

Outcome:
Matt's work continues both in the field and theoretically. He is currently researching and interviewing leading game designers and publishers and blogging about his experience with Edutopia.

Laura Zieger
lzieger@njcu.edu

Matthew Farber
mattfarber1@gmail.com
New Jersey City University

Bio
Dr. Laura Zieger is the Chair and a Professor in the department of Educational Technology and School Library Media at New Jersey City University. Her recent contributions to the field focus on online teaching and learning, student-centered instructional approaches and strategies integrating emerging technologies, and social computing applications in education (including game-based approaches).

Matthew D. Farber teaches Social Studies at Valleyview Middle School, in Denville, NJ. Mr. Farber is currently pursuing an Ed.D. In Educational Technology Leadership from New Jersey City University, where he is an adjunct instructor. He blogs regularly about game-based learning for Edutopia.


Perceived Benefits and Cost of the Use of For-Profit Online Management Company for Developing Totally Online MA in Holistic Health Studies Program at Georgian Court University

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time: 3:30PM - 4:00PM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
As a vision to becoming a regional university, one of Georgian Court University's institutional strategic goals was to establish a totally online program. Simultaneously, we recognized our prospective students' increased needs for such in Master of Arts in Holistic Health Studies program and others. As a solution to a lack of consistent IT support of online program development, the institution made a decision to contract with one of the for-profit online program management companies, the Learning House (TLH). What are the cost and benefits of such investment for a for-profit online management company while developing a totally online program? More specifically, what are the perceived benefits and cost for the faculty who are involved in this process? In addition, we share what we have learned from this experience.

Presentation Content:
This presentation will provide you the insight gained from the experience of faculty members who were directly involved in the development of 100% online MA program using an external online management company. Benefits and cost of such arrangement, particularly the faculty experience will be shared.
As a vision to becoming a regional university, one of Georgian Court University's institutional strategic goals was to establish a totally online program. Simultaneously, we recognized our prospective students' increased needs for such in Master of Arts in Holistic Health Studies program and others. As a solution to a lack of consistent IT support of online program development, the institution made a decision to contract with one of the for-profit online program management companies, the Learning House (TLH). What are the cost and benefits of such investment for a for-profit online management company while developing a totally online program? More specifically, what are the perceived benefits and cost for the faculty who are involved in this process? In addition, we share what we have learned from this experience.

As a result, MA in Holistic Health has successfully offering 100% online program since the summer of 2012. Another most significant and visible benefit for our institution as a whole was that over 50 faculty members participated in one or more of the online training on online teaching and course development where there was no such training prior. However, such training's true value has not been assessed as an institution as of yet. For faculty who were involved in the process directly, there were some quiet drop outs from the process due to various concerns such as intellectual property, privacy, and autonomy as a faculty creating the course materials. All minor Initial glitches including registration synchronization between our institutional registration and TLH's, duplicated course shells, etc. were solved by persistent communication among all involved. Additional strategy was to launch the course 1 week prior to the official semester beginning. It cannot be done without faculty/staff who communicate and work towards resolutions with all parties involved.

The success of 100% online MA in Holistic Health launching was based on the power of cooperation among all involved as well as having experienced adjunct faculty who excels in and passionate about online teaching. Other institutions that are contemplating to employ a similar IT arrangement to develop totally online program can be mindful of their decisions.

Sachiko Komagata
komagatas@georgian.edu
Georgian Court University

Bio
Sachiko Komagata was born and raised in Japan received BPE from Japan Women's College of Physical Education, both MPT and Ph.D. from Temple University. Worked as a Physical Therapist over a decade in Philadelphia suburban hospital and taught as an adjunct faculty at Temple University, Thomas Jefferson University, and UMDNJ. Since 2004, she teaches both undergraduate and graduate Holistic Health courses and undergraduate Exercise Science course and currently serves as a Chair of the Department of Holistic Health and Exercise Science at Georgian Court University. She co-authored books with her husband: Ava's Bedside: Making Sense through Attachment and The Mind-Body Connection behind Holistic Approaches to Health: Recent Advancements and Current Limitations.


"Always On" Utilizing Facebook (and other Social Medias) To Create a Perpetual Learning Environment

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 11:05AM - 11:35AM
Venue: Trustees Conference Room (SLC 209)

Abstract:
Geared towards those in the Visual Arts but adaptable to many subject, Facebook is a social space that transcends space and time. By turning the tables on students and encouraging them to utilize FB as a structured extension of the classroom environment, students will find themselves in a state of perpetual learning.

Presentation Content
Summary Statement:
Social Media is ideally suited for exposure to peer generated content and sharing of user content. By successfully incorporating a structured use of portals such as Facebook and Instagram into the classroom the course becomes a hybrid of in-person and online where opportunities for organic student lead discussion becomes the norm. Additionally, by extending this use of Social Media into smartphone access to the portal students have the potential of perpetually being in a learning mode that is natural, fun, and lives on beyond the end of the course.

Description:
We will look at a few current and past FB classroom portals and discuss the type of structure utilized to encourage students to autonomously take ownership of their learning environment.

Outcome:
Attendees will learn about options for engaging the student in social media forums that they naturally frequent. Best practices to create an environment that becomes a natural continuity of the classroom will be discussed. Opportunities to utilize social media as a tool for critical thinking and life-long learning will be presented. Potential challenges experienced will be addressed.

Importance:
By deemphasizing the classroom as the only space for learning, educators have the opportunity to meet students in their natural social space and encourage them to expand their perception of how these spaces can enrich their natural interests.

Basem Hassan
bhassan@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College

Bio
Basem Hassan is an established educator and contemporary fine artist exhibiting in museums and galleries internationally. His works utilize photography, new media, and performance to investigate issues such as Islamic identity, transnational culture conflict, and most recently repressed romanticism. His work has been purchased by several institution including the Chelsea Art Museum and Columbia University. He has his MFA from Rutgers, Mason Gross School of the Arts, graduating with honors at the top of his class and an Ed.M. from Teachers College, Columbia University. As an academic his writings have been in gallery catalogues in the US and UK. He has taught classes at Rutgers University Mason Gross School of the Arts and at Guggenheim Museum in New York City. He is an Instructor in the Design Department at Brookdale Community College's Center for Visual Arts.

Basem currently gives presentations around the country on the intersection of contemporary art and Islam. He has been a keynote speaker at conferences held at Guggenheim Museum, Rutgers, NYU, College of Saint Elizabeth, WBAI Pacifica Radio, and breakout presenter at University of Colorado at Boulder, ISNA Education Conference, and many smaller gallery events.


Using a Virtual World to Engage Online Learners

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time: 11:05AM - 11:35AM
Venue: Atlantic Room (SLC 105)

Abstract:
The utilization of virtual worlds in online learning can have a positive impact on student engagement and satisfaction, especially at the K-12 level. There have been many variants of online learning that are being implemented, however this presentation will discuss issues facing online learning and how a 3D virtual world can have positive effects for the teacher and students. The environment that is utilized for this research is unlike many other products that have fallen from vogue due to issues. A key to successful implementation covered will be how these environments must have easy entry for the instructor.

Presentation Content
I am presenting a research study that I conducted using an experimental design approach in a middle school science course. I used a virtual world with a control group to examine the impact on learning. The key to this study as opposed to many people who have previously used worlds like Second Life or others is that the environment used had a low entry point for the teacher and students.

The students called the virtual world a game, which was likely due to the combination of avatars and instructional design. There was no difference in educational achievement from the traditional classroom, however the students showed a significant difference in engagement and satisfaction. The students also enjoyed the ability to use the chat feature to respond to the teacher and interact with other students. The use of back channeling during instruction can have implications for practitioners in a brick and mortar classroom as well.

This is one of the few studies conducted using online learning and virtual worlds that used an experimental design approach to control for the environment. Previous research by the Department of Education that only 5 previous studies were conducted using this type of method. The key though is that my goal is to achieve practical applications of technology, not just sticking on the academic novelty of the study. The audience will see what could become a best practice to incorporate high levels of interaction in online learning an engaging environment. My goal is that participants take away a method to help increase student interaction in their own courses or possible opportunities to build on my research.

Chris Carnahan
ccarnahan@njcu.edu
New Jersey City University

Jennifer Serviss
jserviss@longbranch.k12.nj.us

Bio
Dr. Carnahan is an Assistant professor in Educational Technology Department. Previously he served as an administrator for an online high school. Dr. Carnahan has had a research track that has focused primarily on the use of online and virtual world learning at the K-12 level. He has published in refereed journals and conference proceedings such as TechTrends, Journal of Communications Media, and Proceedings of the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference. His research focuses on the application of technology in order to facilitate the learning process with a pragmatic approach blending practical tactics with scientific research.

Jennifer Serviss is the Technology Advisor for an elementary school in New Jersey. She holds a New Jersey State teaching certification in Special Education; a New Jersey State certification as a School Library Media Specialist and a Supervisor certification in the state of New Jersey. She has also earned a South Carolina State teaching certification in Special Education. Her Master in Arts Degree is in Educational Technology. She is currently a doctoral student in the Educational Technology Department at New Jersey City University.


Using Technology Intentionally in Our Teaching/ Using Technology Mindfully in Our Lives

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 1:10PM - 1:40PM
Venue: Fort Hancock Room (SLC 208)

Abstract:
Many people -- of all ages -- are almost constantly looking at a digital screen. Some of this use is because technology provides great tools for efficiency and for being in contact with otherwise inaccessible communities. At the same time, voices emphasizing the dangers of too much screen-time are becoming louder. This presentation demonstrates that intentional use of technology in our teaching, as well as mindfulness in use of technology in our lives can lead to better learning outcomes and even to improved well-being overall. Informed choices in daily use of technology can benefit all of us.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement:
This presentation emphasizes that intentional use of technology in our teaching, as well as mindfulness in use of technology in our lives can lead to better learning outcomes and even to improved well-being overall. Drawing on experts such as José Antonio Bowen and Clive Thompson's works, as well as my own thinking on the topics at hand, I will suggest concrete ideas on how to re-think technology use for teaching and in life.

Description of activity, project, or solution:
Part I - Using Technology Intentionally in Our Teaching
This boils down to making sure technology, both in and outside of the classroom, is useful to your events. We have to take an honest look at what we are using currently and being open to make radical changes. What we cannot afford to do at this important (disrupted!) time in higher education is recreate current pedagogies with well-intentioned but misdirected technology choices.

The presentation includes examples from experts in this emerging field, such as José Antonio Bowen and Clive Thompson. In his book, Teaching Naked, Bowen contends that moving technology out of classrooms altogether will improve student learning. The presentation will include specific ideas about how to accomplish this (lofty!) goal.

In his book, Smarter Than You Think: How Technology is Changing Our Minds for the Better," Clive Thomson (who spoke at the NJEDge Annual Conference last November) writes about the many ways in which we can all benefit by being able to reach otherwise unreachable communities and by taking advantage of -- or even coming up with -- unprecedented tools that can make learning far more active and meaningful to our students. These types of projects often include mapping software and data analysis, referred to as Digital Humanities.

An example of Digital Humanities from my own University is a Comparative Religion professor, Louis Hamilton, who has collaborated with his students for the past six years on a Mapping Dante's Florence project.

Part II - Using Technology Mindfully in Our Lives
Recently I posted a picture on Facebook, and an old friend of mine "liked" it. I hadn't heard from her in a while, so I wrote her a Facebook message asking her how she has been doing and saying that it would be great to catch up. She responded that it would be great, and asked when I might be available to talk on the phone. I sent a short answer that maybe in a day or two would be good. She then texted me that Monday would work, and asked what time I would be free. I just texted her that I'll try to call around 4:30. Before all of this technology, wouldn't I have just called her directly without making an official appointment? Why can't I still do that?

There is a lot of information in the media in recent years about mindfulness in technology use. It is ironic in a way, because there are numerous Apps that promote mindfulness, such as Arianna Huffington's GPS for the Soul, as well as any number of meditation Apps that are designed to encourage people to take a break from their busy (often technology-overloaded) days.

Outcome:
Teaching and "real life" technology use dovetailed nicely at the end of last semester. I taught a First Year Seminar called Intentionality and Technology: How does Screentime Affect Your "Real" Life? and presented on it at the NJEDge annual conference.

In my course I implemented some of the ideas about intentional use of technology. For example we used Google docs for in-class and group homework collaboration, I used Twitter to communicate announcements to class (in addition to posting them on Moodle), and I also used a 5-minute meditation (http://www.calm.com/) to begin each class period.

Now that the course is over, I've had some time to process how it went and what my students and I learned from it. I'm happy to report that my students were much more thoughtful about this than I had predicted. I will share some of their writing from the final assignment to conclude the presentation.

Importance or relevance to other institutions:
If our institutions intend to remain competitive in the quickly-changing world of higher education, we need to re-think pedagogical strategies at every level. Choosing carefully how to leverage technology in teaching is a part of the larger transformation that is occurring around us. Moreover, finding balance in our own lives also merits some serious rethinking of how much time we allocate to being on-screen and online.

Gamin Bartle
gbartle@drew.edu
Drew University

Bio
Gamin Bartle, Ph.D., is Director of Instructional Technology and User Services at Drew University, where she also oversees instructional technology-related faculty development. Before coming to Drew, She taught German and managed Language Resource Centers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Tuscaloosa. Gamin received a Graduate Certificate in Training and Educational Technology in the Educational Technology Leadership program at George Washington University in December 2012.


Using Technology to Maintain Quality and Facilitate Communication in a Large Department

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 3:30PM - 4:00PM
Venue: Fort Hancock Room (SLC 208)

Abstract:
Brookdale Community College math faculty work collaboratively to develop course resources that support student learning in all sections of our courses. This is an essential activity to supplement the course text, particularly in departments with many sections of the same course. To assist faculty and maintain quality in a large department, we created repositories for course curriculum and master courses for our instructors in Canvas. In this session we will discuss how these repositories and master courses are used to maintain consistency across sections, and demonstrate how to use Canvas to facilitate communication.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: With approximately 100 adjunct faculty and 33 full-time faculty, the Brookdale Mathematics Department strives to facilitate communication with all course instructors. Toward that end, we have developed repositories and master courses in Canvas. In this session, we will discuss how these mechanisms provide instantaneous access to the most current course curriculum and the foundation for our instructors to utilize Canvas in a web-enhanced class.

Description of activity, project, or solution: Communication is an essential component to the effective operation of any department. In the Brookdale Mathematics Department, we use Canvas to communicate with our faculty. We created learning object repositories for each course, in which we store all course curriculum. We also have a master course for each of our courses, which serves as a template for an instructor's web-enhanced course and contains helpful links and a gradebook. In addition, we have created a course that contains department information and newsletters. The leadership team, comprised of Department Chairs and the Dean, uses two Canvas courses for planning documents and to store department records.

Outcome: Faculty have come to depend on and expect that they can access current and relevant documents in Canvas. Survey results indicate that almost all of our adjuncts use the learning object repositories regularly. Faculty are encouraged to copy the master course and add their own content. This facilitates communication between students and their instructor. At this time over 75% of our instructors have a web-enhanced class.

Importance or relevance to other institutions: Although this session will have specific references to the use of Canvas, the model for virtual storage of documents can be utilized by any department. We will share lessons learned along the road to supporting faculty and keeping a personal touch in a large department.

Oly Malpica Proctor
omalpicaproctor@brookdalecc.edu

Arminda Wey
awey@brookdalecc.edu

Barbara Tozzi
btozzi@brookdalecc.edu

Brookdale Community College

Bio
Ms. Oly Malpica Proctor is an Associate Professor of Mathematics at Brookdale College where she serves as Assistant Department Chair. Besides teaching, her responsibilities include managing the hiring, mentoring, evaluation and professional development of new adjunct faculty. She is actively involved in the development of mathematics curriculum reflecting pedagogical innovations and new technology. Currently, Oly serves as a Mathematics Department CANVAS liaison to the Teaching and Learning Center at Brookdale Community College.

Arminda Wey is a Professor of Mathematics at Brookdale Community College. She is currently an Assistant Department Chair where her responsibilities include public relations for the department, creating and supporting STEM initiatives, grant writing, and development of faculty. During her 18 years at Brookdale she has taught courses ranging from developmental pre-algebra to calculus III and widely uses technology in all her courses.

Barbara Tozzi is a Professor of Mathematics at Brookdale Community College, which is located less than 20 minutes from Asbury Park and the beautiful Jersey shore. During her 22 years at Brookdale, she has taught courses ranging from developmental through calculus II, and currently teaches an online intermediate algebra class. Barbara is an Assistant Department Chair, whose responsibilities include assessment, curriculum, and serving as a liaison with the bookstore. She was a Canvas liaison last summer, helping faculty, staff and administrators transition to Canvas.


Using SafeAssign as a Teaching Tool: Helping Students "Detect and Correct" Plagiarism

Track: Health Sciences, Cyber Security Learning
Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
Venue: Navesink I (SLC 216)

Abstract:
Plagiarism is a common issue on college campuses, especially in the digital age (Gabriel, 2010). Students are often unaware of what plagiarism is, and therefore are unsure about how to avoid it. The Draft feature in SafeAssign can harness the power of technology to educate students about plagiarism, by helping students "detect and correct" unintentional plagiarism, before submitting their final papers. This presentation will teach faculty how to use the draft feature in SafeAssign (it's more than just checking "Draft"), and discuss some of the pitfalls of this process. Anecdotal evidence of this feature's success is discussed.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: This presentation will describe how to use the "Draft" feature in SafeAssign, both conceptually, and methodologically, as a tool to help students identify and correct instances of unintentional plagiarism.

Description of activity, problem, or solution: As a faculty member, I was noticing a fairly substantial number of student papers with plagiarized content. In the digital age, this is not surprising. Not only is it easy to copy and paste, but students have unfettered access to a plethora of information. In an era of "file-sharing, Wikipedia, and web-linking" (Gabriel, 2010, paragraph 3), it is not surprising that students are unaware of the need to paraphrase and cite the source of their information. Indeed, when I confronted plagiarizing students with the evidence, many were surprised: they thought that by citing the source of their information, and possibly changing a few words in each sentence, they had not plagiarized.

There are a number of applications available to help faculty members detect plagiarism, but traditionally, they have been used to "catch and punish" students after the fact. I always felt badly about using the tools in this way, especially when so many students seemed to be caught off guard by the results. As an educator, I felt responsible for teaching them how to solve the problem. Therefore, in addition to having the librarian discuss plagiarism and citation issues in my classes, I allowed students to check their work for plagiarism by using the "Draft" feature in SafeAssign. Using this method, students may submit an optional copy of their paper via SafeAssign, to detect any instances of plagiarism, and correct them before submitting final papers to me. An additional benefit of this method may be that intentional plagiarizers will "think twice" before submitting a plagiarized document.

Although it seems like a straightforward process, (i.e., check the "draft" box when creating a SafeAssignment), experience has shown that it is not quite that easy. There are a number of problems that other faculty members and I have encountered along the way, for example: -- Only creating a "draft" SafeAssignment, and having to clear submissions when students wanted to resubmit -- Students not knowing how to retrieve or interpret the SafeAssign report -- Students not taking advantage of the option of submitting a draft report Outcome: Anecdotally, offering a "draft" SafeAssignment seems to be working. Although there have been a few bumps in the road, over time, more and more students have been submitting drafts of their papers for SafeAssign review, and fewer students have submitted papers with significant plagiarism.
Additionally, as an instructional designer, I've created documentation to help faculty and students avoid some of the pitfalls described above, and I'm in the process of creating a Learning Object to teach students about plagiarism and how to interpret a SafeAssign report.

Importance or relevance to other institutions: Plagiarism is a significant problem in college classrooms today. Technology has made it easier to plagiarize, whether intentionally or unintentionally. Using SafeAssign as a tool to allow students to "detect and correct" plagiarism can harness the power of technology to educate students about plagiarism, and avoid it in the future.

Reference
Gabriel, T. (2010, August 1). Plagiarism lines blur for students in digital age. New York Times. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/02/education/02cheat.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Jarrod Cecere
jce@berkeleycollege.edu
Berkeley College

Bio
Jarrod Cecere, MS, is an Instructional Designer at Berkeley College. He has designed and instructed both on-site and online classes in Psychology for the past 11 years. He is currently enrolled in a doctoral program in General Psychology with a concentration in Psychology Instruction, at Capella University.


Incorporating audience response systems in to a large enrollment Introduction to Psychology class

Track: Learning Solutions
Time: 2:55PM - 3:25PM
Venue: Twinlights II (SLC 107)

Abstract:
Audience response systems (ARS) have been gaining popularity in teaching environments, particularly as access via mobile devices has increased. We will discuss how an ARS system has been used successfully in a large Introduction to Psychology class. Specific content will include the "how-tos" of using an iclicker response system, best practices for maximizing student engagement and learning as well as sharing specific examples that can address multiple teaching goals.

Presentation Content:
Summary Statement: We will present the rationale for using audience response systems (ARS) in large classrooms, supported by specific examples, data regarding usage and best practices.

Description of activity, project or solution: After teaching a 120 student Intro to Psychology class for the first time, it was quickly apparent that student involvement was an issue. The following semester, we incorporated ARS technology to enhance student participation. Throughout the five semesters that we have taught the course utilizing ARS technology, we have developed several applications to maximize student engagement and learning, such as helping students decode multiple-choice questions, identifying areas of particular difficulty, and general polling regarding classroom experiences.

Outcome: Student response to the ARS has been predominantly positive. They appreciate the diverse methods of participation that ARS provides and many have noted that it has helped them prepare for exams. Additionally, the number of students who received either a D or an F in the class decreased from 25% to 18% the semester that ARS was first incorporated. Some of the challenges we will discuss include logistical and administrative issues and determining how best to incorporate the technology.

Importance or relevance to other institutions: ARS are tools that can greatly improve teaching and learning in a large classroom. As this technology is gaining popularity on university campuses and devices are becoming more mobile, understanding potential applications can provide faculty with ideas for improving the classroom experience.

Paige Fisher
paige.fisher@shu.edu

Shayle Adrian
shayle.adrian@shu.edu
Seton Hall University

Bio

Paige Fisher holds a doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She is currently an assistant professor in the Psychology Department at Seton Hall University and has been teaching Introduction to Psychology for six years.

Shayle Adrian is an instructional designer in the Teaching, Learning and Technology Center at Seton Hall, where she helps support faculty in the use of technology. She is a graduate of the University of Georgia (M.Ed., Instructional Technology and M.S., Developmental Psychology) and has taught courses in instructional technology, research methods, statistics and developmental psychology.


Effective Use of Lecture Capture in a Large Lecture Hall Course

Track: Learning Solutions
Time: 3:30PM - 4:00PM
Venue: Twin Lights I (SLC 106)

Abstract:
This presentation will be a report on an iterative pilot program that has been taking place at the School of Communication and Information (SC&I) in the area of integrating lecture capture technology into a large lecture hall course. The use of lecture capture allows instructors to refer students back to parts of lectures for review (rather than having to repeat content), can allow one instructor to manage the content delivered via lecture to multiple sections of a course, and allows students to view, review, clarify and otherwise utilize recordings for knowledge development.

Presentation Content:
This presentation will be a report on an iterative pilot program that has been taking place at the School of Communication and Information (SC&I) in the area of integrating lecture capture technology into a large lecture hall course. The use of lecture capture allows instructors to refer students back to parts of lectures for review (rather than having to repeat content), can allow one instructor to manage the content delivered via lecture to multiple sections of a course, and allows students to view, review, clarify and otherwise utilize recordings for knowledge development.

Beginning in the Spring 2013 semester, and continuing in the Fall 2013 semester, Professor Linardopoulos has been recording each 80 minute Introduction to Communication (04:189:101) class session with the Panopto lecture capture software and releasing it to students for their use immediately after the class session. Recordings consist of the instructor's voice, his PowerPoint presentation, and anything else he displays on his laptop's screen including his iClicker questions and results. Recordings are released to students via a link in the course management system used for the course and all students are given a Panopto viewer account using their Rutgers' NetID credentials to access the recordings. This is a large lecture hall course with approximately 450 students most of whom are in their first or second year of college.

Come and hear more about the progress of this program and how you might be able to incorporate the program's findings and best practices into your online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses.

Steve Garwood
sgarwood@rutgers.edu

Nick Linardopoulos
nl222@rutgers.edu
Rutgers University

Bio

Steve Garwood is the Assistant Dean of Instructional Support and Assessment in the School of Communication and Information (SC&I) at Rutgers University and has worked approximately ten years in the field of instructional design and technology in higher education. He holds a Masters in Communication and Information Studies (MCIS), a Masters in Library Service (MLS), and is currently enrolled in the Ed. D. program at Rutgers University.

Nick Linardopoulos is the Public Speaking Course Coordinator at the Department of Communication at Rutgers. He has developed and taught over 10 different online and hybrid courses during the last 9 years. He has a PhD in Educational Leadership and Learning Technologies.


Selecting our Canvas

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 2:20PM - 2:50PM
Venue: Fort Hancock Room (SLC 208)

Presentation Content:
TCNJ has utilized a homegrown learning management system (LMS) for over a decade. The system was regularly updated to remain competitive, but the most recent explosion of technology, especially mobile technology, put it at a distinct disadvantage versus other systems.

Fall 2010, a Learning Management System Investigation Committee was formed to evaluate the current state of affairs for the LMS. This committee had representation from every school and multiple administrative departments, and was chaired by Ryan Gladysiewicz, Assistant Director of Instructional Technology Services. Through a 2-year analysis of campus polls, vendor demonstrations and LMS assessments, the committee recommended Instructure Canvas at the end of the 2012 spring semester.

Fall 2012, Instructure Canvas was chosen as the new LMS. We will touch on the main reasons Canvas was the first choice for TCNJ.

A pilot was run in spring 2013 with 21 courses. The pilot was successful and feedback was positive overall. Training was offered to faculty at the end of the spring semester. Additional pilots were run with TCNJ's blended learning courses over the summer. The presentation will focus on the spring pilot feedback, faculty training and concerns from the faculty.

For the fall 2013 semester, faculty could choose to run courses in Canvas or the old LMS. Instructors and students were given the opportunity to provide feedback on their experience and we will share these results.

By fall 2014, only Canvas will be available as a LMS.

Ryan Gladysiewicz
gladysie@tcnj.edu
The College of New Jersey

Bio

Ryan Gladysiewicz is the assistant director for Instructional Technology Services at TCNJ. Ryan oversees TCNJ's instructional technology group which provides faculty support for technology in teaching and learning and management of the two learning management systems. He most recently adjuncts for the School of Business, teaching Information Concepts and Database Management Systems, and is an active member in the staff senate and the teaching and learning center program council. He enjoys working with others on technology and exploring the many ways it can be leveraged to meet institutional goals or just to improve everyday life.


Facilitating Independent Learning & Engaged Students - A Unique Approach to Hybrid Course Design!

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time: 1:10PM - 1:40PM
Venue: Molly Pitcher Room (SLC 104)

Abstract:
The presenters will show a hybrid course design model for a "Public Speaking" hybrid course offered in spring 2014, which can be used for broader applications in diverse disciplines. The model creates a single, seamless learning environment that integrates both online and in-class components that facilitates independent learning. Major assignments are deconstructed into stages with scaffolding to support students, and custom-rubrics communicate expectations and provide metrics for measuring students' progress. Students engage in collaborative activities and peer-reviews using collaborative tools and technology. Join the presenters as they discuss their collaboration and experiences in designing, developing, and teaching this course.

Denise Kreiger
denise.kreiger@rutgers.edu

Ralph Gigliotti
rag153@scarletmail.rutgers.edu
Rutgers University

Bio

Denise Kreiger is the Instructional Design and Technology Specialist in the School of Information and Communication at Rutgers University and has worked over nine years in higher education with extensive experience in instructional design and technology. She supports faculty in designing, developing, and teaching classroom-based, web-enhanced, hybrid, and fully online courses using learning management systems and instructional technology based on pedagogical best practices. She holds a Master of Education (M.Ed.) and a BA in English with NJ teaching certifications in Associate Educational Media Specialist, English, and Elementary Education, and is a certified peer reviewer in Quality Matters.

Ralph Gigliotti is a Part-Time Lecturer in the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University and Assistant Director of Student Development for Leadership Programs, Student Development, at Villanova University. He has worked over five years in student development, leadership education, communication, and public administration. He holds an MA in Strategic Communication, a MPA on Public Administration, and is currently enrolled in the Ph.D. program at Rutgers University.


Contemporary Issues through Videoconferencing (CITVC): "Preparing Students for Participation in Democracy and Global Citizenship"


Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time: 10:30AM - 11:00AM
Venue: Molly Pitcher Room (SLC 104)

Abstract:
Through a vital global perspective, CITVC allows students to gain skills necessary for productive problem solving and decision-making. The refinement of these skills is aimed at preparing students to become effective and responsible contributors at the individual, community, state, national, and international levels.


Presentation Content:

Participants in this session will learn how 21st Century technology applications like videoconferencing; interactive virtual field trips, forums and social networking promote dialogue with students, educators, and experts from around the world. We will also discuss how globalization and the advancements in technology require us, as educators, to reflect on past practices and develop new pedagogies for our changing world.

Summary Statement:
Participants in this session will learn how 21st Century technology applications like videoconferencing; interactive virtual field trips, forums and social networking promote dialogue with students, educators, and experts from around the world. We will also discuss how globalization and the advancements in technology require us, as educators, to reflect on past practices and develop new pedagogies for our changing world.

Description of activity, project, or solution:
Over the course of the past 12 years, Passaic Valley has explored various ways of maximizing the use of distance learning technology applications, like videoconferencing, to provide unique and meaningful educational experiences for the students and staff. These programs fell into two basic categories: programs created and offered by content providers, and programs created and developed internally. Some of the most successful of these has been our own 24 hour Around the World Videoconference programs that connect us with a variety of countries across the globe, and Science in Cinema based programs that connect our students with experts from around the world. Some of the most valuable partnerships we have made with content providers include NJEDge.net and MAGPI who provide us with both content and technical support, and Global Education Motivators, and Global Nomads who provide us with projects based on United Nation Initiatives and current global issues.

As a result of the continuing success of these program offerings, we decided to create a course at Passaic Valley that we hoped would maximize the positive results we were witnessing in the development of the programs and the global experience and maturity level of the students who were participating in these activities. The creation of the course would also provide us with more flexibility and consistency in ensuring the attendance and motivation of students in the class. With Current Events as the overriding theme, we also envisioned transferring more ownership of the course to the participating students thus developing the skills necessary for taking responsibility for their own learning.

-To enhance student awareness of the interrelationship of the various cultures of the world
-To encourage and foster student-to-student exchange and increase opportunities for both students and teachers to experience activities focused on global awareness
-To use technology for direct access to sources of information that are continually changing in order to expand the walls of our school and library
-To become effective and responsible contributors to problem-solving and to decision-making processes at individual, community, national, and international levels
-To bring youth face-to-face to meet and to discuss world issues that affect and unite us all
-To learn about the historical background of all countries involved
-To aid students in exhibiting reflective attitudes toward their personal values, the values of others, and the cultural values evident in their own and other societies
-To provide students with information technology skills that students will need to be successful in their education and careers
-To develop and apply skills related to acquiring, organizing, evaluating, and using information technology as a communication tool
-To increase opportunities for both students and teachers to experience activities focused upon national and global awareness
-To encourage students to embrace their global citizenship by becoming knowledgeable and pro-active
-To raise tolerance of different value systems and cultures


Importance or Relevance to Other Institutions

It is important to remember that the United States is such a dominant force in the world that most of our students tend to lose sight of how we appear in the eyes of the global population. News and other media also provide a distinct bias in how we see ourselves and how we are portrayed. If we are ever going to change that view, it must be through the education of our youth. Our students need to learn not just what is happening in the world, but why. More importantly this must be understood from a global, cross-cultural perspective. Our students must also gain experience in how to work cooperatively with citizens of other nations to solve world problems and to achieve world peace. Through these international projects our students are given that opportunity to truly examine who we are from a global perspective. As the students interact they gain an awareness and understanding of their counterpart's perspective on the issues. They are also able to further share and debate their ideas and views as they seek to find solutions to global problems. Students are then challenged to reexamine their views and form new conclusions.

The advances in communication technology like videoconferencing and the Internet offers this generation a unique opportunity. It is our challenge to learn to understand each other, be aware of each other's thoughts and feelings, work cooperatively to solve problems, and above all, not repeat the mistakes of those who came before us. Overall, it is our belief that these programs foster international friendships, and a better understanding of our role and responsibilities in an ever-changing world.

Kathleen Menake
Passaic Valley High School
menakek@pvhs.k12.nj.us

Bio

Kathleen Menake is a Social Studies teacher from Passaic Valley Regional High School in Little Falls, New Jersey. She has taught for 13 years and has taught the following courses: World History Honors, U.S. History II, American Government and Contemporary Issues through Videoconferencing. Kathleen has incorporated videoconferencing into her courses for over ten years; she and her students have participated in hundreds of videoconferences since 2003. With a drive to encourage her students to become global citizens, Kathleen helped to design and teaches the course Contemporary Issues through Videoconferencing, which is currently in its 6th year. It is an elective course open to juniors and seniors in high school and it prepares students to engage in inquiry-based learning. Students are encouraged to pursue their own projects, i.e., the creation of content for the course. It prepares students to become effective and responsible contributors at the individual, community, state, national and international levels.


Focus on Learning, Teaching and Practice

Track: Social Media, Faculty Development
Time: 1:45PM - 2:15PM
Venue: Trustees Conference Room (SLC 209)

Abstract:
In order to become eligible to teach a fully online course, faculty at the College must successfully complete a Certification Course: Focus on Learning, Teaching and Practice. While this course explores the role of technology and utilizes the LMS for its hybrid presentation, the focus in on pedagogy.

Presentation Content:
This presentation will highlight the learning objectives of the course, with participants participating in some of the learning activities. We will show that with successful completion the skills and experience to: -- design and successfully teach a fully online course; -- leverage active learning techniques to demonstrate and facilitate learning; -- apply learning topics such as cognitive theories, motivation techniques, feedback, instructional design best practices, the Quality Matter Rubric and assessments to the development of a fully online course; -- successfully complete the administrative tasks such as following processes of the Teaching and Learning Center; -- work within the college's academic policies and codes of conduct;-- complete the processes involved in developing an online course and adapt or use existing instructional design processes; -- develop online course materials and be comfortable within the College's Learning Management System, are gained. Norah Kerr-McCurry
nkerr-mccurry@brookdalecc.edu
Brookdale Community College

Bio

Norah Kerr-McCurry is the Director of the Teaching and Learning Center at Brookdale Community College. Norah teaches the certification course for online faculty, plans and implements student success initiatives, plans and implement professional development activities for faculty, and administers the Learning Management System. She serves as an adjunct instructor at Brookdale in the Speech Communication department, and as a part-time lecturer at Rutgers University teaching a Social Media and Work course for the School of Management and Labor Relations.


Ocean County College Online Science - The Kit is It!

Track: Student Engagement HE & K12
Time: 3:30PM - 4:00PM
Venue: Molly Pitcher Room (SLC 104)

Abstract:
Ocean County College provides online science courses to hundreds of students nationally and internationally. Through the use of robust online content, engaging learning exercises, and hands-on lab kits, OCC Online's science courses are widely regarded as some of the best and most transferable online science courses around. It is believed the success of these courses is due to the integration of lecture with a series hands-on laboratory exercises from a customized lab kit.


Presentation Content:
Summary Statement - this presentation will focus on the importance of an integrated lecture and laboratory experience, the utilization of a laboratory kit.

Description of Activity -Beginning in 2007, Ocean County College began developing online Science courses utilizing laboratory kits. Since that time, almost all of the Science courses offered by OCC have an aniline equivalent, and it is now possible to obtain a degree in Science completely online.

Outcome - Data indicate that online courses offered at OCC have lower attrition rates, equivalent GPA's, and higher performance on standardized tests of achievement (HAPS exam).

Relevance - online Science courses offered at OCC have a high success and transfer rate, Enrollment in these courses has expanded internationally as well as to the military.

Marc LaBella
mlabella@ocean.edu
Ocean County College

Bio

Over 15 years ago, I began developing and teaching distance-learning courses. I have taught at the college level for 30 years in the capacity of both a professor and an administrator at Felician College in Lodi, New Jersey, and now as a full-time tenured Associate Professor at Ocean County College. I have graduate training in Biology, Educational Psychology, and Statistics, and have taught courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels (face to face and online).

I have a passion for teaching and a respect for new and innovative forms of learning; because of this passion, I helped to develop an accelerated degree program in Business for returning adults, have developed and taught numerous distance-learning courses, and am now a certified online instructor as well as a certified online peer evaluator. Of course, lately have been busy putting Ocean County College's Science Courses online, and I love every minute of it.